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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This was my first attempt at a box joint. I think the set/spacing pin was a bit too loose, but the joints came out ok for my purposes. I'm looking for advice on the best ways to trim the joint flush. For the other corners I used a flush trim router bit, but can't use that here. The faces are glued to the fronts of the drawers.

Thanks,
Mike
 

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You’ll probably have to use a sharp chisel


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
 

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As far as cleaning up the overhang you have now you might put a broad knife up against the drawer front to shield it and sand the sides with an orbital sander.

The dado's were too deep in both directions. To really have any strength the parts have to fit together perfect. In order to get it set up right you have to make a mock up with scrap wood before machining you parts.

I think I would have assembled the box first before attaching the front. That way you could putty and sand the sides of the box before final assembly. Often when you are making a cross cut dado like that there will be a little chipping and needs a little putty.
 

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Clean them up with a chisel and sanding. It looks like a drawer for shop use so I would just do the best I could. You learned from this so next time it will be better. :smile2:
 

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where's my table saw?
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sanding first

In order to glue on the front, you have had to sand the ends of first? Why didn't you sand them off on the sides at the same time? You said you used a flush trim bit which was probably OK.

Now you have 3 choices, as suggested, a chisel working small amounts away at at time, A japanese pull saw holding it down flush to the sides, or a ROS using a sheild to stay off the back of the front.... :|

OR chisel or saw, then sander.:vs_cool:
 

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In order to glue on the front, you have had to sand the ends of first? Why didn't you sand them off on the sides at the same time? You said you used a flush trim bit which was probably OK.

Now you have 3 choices, as suggested, a chisel working small amounts away at at time, A japanese pull saw holding it down flush to the sides, or a ROS using a sheild to stay off the back of the front.... :|

OR chisel or saw, then sander.:vs_cool:
Sometimes people focus on one thing and miss something else. It's part of learning.
 

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For spots like this I can sometimes start with a rasp, go to a file and finish with sandpaper wrapped around a block.
 

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if you have a dado blade, you can place the front against the fence, and place a spacer block to elevate the drawer level, then cut off the nubs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the tips everyone! I like the flush cut saw idea, but the wood I have to trim is too low for it to be effective. I'm not sure the chisel I have is sharp enough, so the rasp may be best. I glued the facing before assembling because I wanted to drill out the holes for the handles. Maybe next time I'll screw the facing to the front rather than gluing it.
 

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Thanks for the tips everyone! I like the flush cut saw idea, but the wood I have to trim is too low for it to be effective. I'm not sure the chisel I have is sharp enough, so the rasp may be best. I glued the facing before assembling because I wanted to drill out the holes for the handles. Maybe next time I'll screw the facing to the front rather than gluing it.
As you know, most rasps are considered rough cut. Even the smooth side of a rasp is usually rougher than a file. Files vary from a medium cut to a fine cut. Same with sandpaper. 80 grit usually cuts pretty fast. Good luck.
 

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I'm not sure the chisel I have is sharp enough, so the rasp may be best. .
Whenever someone decides to get into woodworking and asks me about chisels, I tell them that the brand of chisel is not as important as knowing how to sharpen it. I'd suggest getting yourself a real sharpening stone and practise getting that chisel sharp. A sharp chisel comes in handy in the shop a whole lot more frequently than a dull one does. Good luck!
 

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I’ve never done it, but to go with TimPa’s suggestion, here’s YouTube video by William Ng showing just how to do it. He has another video on how he made the table saw jig he used. …one day I’ll make one, LOL…

I feel the whole video is work watching, but the link should start when he first talks about this kind of cut. He first talks about solid wood edge banding and the he demos cutting off plywood box finger joints flush:

Multi Function Table Saw Jig: Flush trim and Cut small pieces Safely
https://youtu.be/AddH8IgL7wY?t=7m22s
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Might be a good time to learn how to sharpen chisels. Good project to test your new sharpening skills on. Knowing how to sharpen your tools is a valuable skill.
Yes I should learn how to do that. I'm only an occasional woodworker though.

Turns out all I needed was very coarse sandpaper on my power sander.

Thanks everyone!
 
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