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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just scored a large load of wild cherry. A couple of pieces have already been split down the middle. My question is how is the best way to flatten the the split side to attach a face plate? My BS is out of service with both tires removed. Can I drill a hole on the split side (and it not being flat) and use the screw that came with my chuck and safely shape the bottom?
Tom
 

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tom i have done that with the worm screw and done ok
make sure you use the tailstock
i have also used a chisel to flatten out a place for a faceplate
 

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+1 with Robert. I have used the worm screw with the tailstock in a similar situation.

I am impressed with the holding power of the worm screw, but I would not want to use it without the tailstock.

I have also used a power planer to flatten an area on the surface. One of the few uses I have these days for my power planer. It gathered dust for decades before I found a use for it with bowl blanks. Sometimes taking off edges to make it vibrate less when starting up.

If you do not have a power planer, then as Robert mentioned a chisel and mallet can work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks Robert and Dave. I had planned on using the tailstock. I don't have a power planer but after I posted I thought about using a hand plane. I will need to go back and look to see what size hole to drill for the screw. I haven't measured them yet but I believe some of the pieces are greater than 20" in diameter. I'm looking forward to trying my hand at a large bowl. I have the powermatic24/42 but I have never attempted anything larger than about 10". Pictures to follow. I'm going to start with about a 10" also.
Tom
 

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A pic or two would be helpful.
I do get/make blanks that're not flat or symmetrical. If not near round/flat, 1 screw WON'T hold. :eek:
You may consider using a chainsaw to get a better flat and then--you know--start slow.:yes:
Forgot to mention that you oughta be between centers--little detail I left out.


Dave H
 

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Using the worm screw will work fine, I do it all the time. You can also use a spur center, just drill a spot for the spur to seat flat against.
 

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One thing I have started doing lately, yes I know it's not the best use of tools but it works, is to take the bowl blank and a Forstner bit that is big enough to fit your chuck jaws into and expand to tighten, and drill a center hole in the blank. Just deep enough for the jaws.

If the blank isn't flat, like a natural edge blank would be curved, then I use the same bit and drill a flat ring around my center whole. That way the body of the chuck is closer to the wood. It allows the chuck to sit flat.
To do this I put the center point of the bit near the edge of the center whole. And just cut away enough material to make a flat surface around the center.

If it helps I would be happy to explain more tomorrow with pictures.


If I can add 1 more point to the worm screw, make sure the wood is firmly pulled into the jaws. It seems obvious but if the wood isn't flat all the way around the jaws, it will start to wobble around the screw when turning.
 

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The best way I have found to flatten an area for a for a faceplate is to drill an area the size of your faceplate on a drill press with a 1" forstnor bit.
 

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BigJoe16 said:
One thing I have started doing lately, yes I know it's not the best use of tools but it works, is to take the bowl blank and a Forstner bit that is big enough to fit your chuck jaws into and expand to tighten, and drill a center hole in the blank. Just deep enough for the jaws. If the blank isn't flat, like a natural edge blank would be curved, then I use the same bit and drill a flat ring around my center whole. That way the body of the chuck is closer to the wood. It allows the chuck to sit flat. To do this I put the center point of the bit near the edge of the center whole. And just cut away enough material to make a flat surface around the center. If it helps I would be happy to explain more tomorrow with pictures. If I can add 1 more point to the worm screw, make sure the wood is firmly pulled into the jaws. It seems obvious but if the wood isn't flat all the way around the jaws, it will start to wobble around the screw when turning.
pictures please. Yes
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Ipads take pics too you know :laughing::laughing::laughing:
Mine doesn't. It's the first generation and does not have a camera. Also I think some times a picture is necessary to help with a problem but I see many cases when someone ask for a picture and the poster post one and never gets any feedback from the individual asking for a picture.
In my case I really don't believe a picture would help. I want to thank everyone that did take the time to give me some assurance that the worm screw would work and other ways to flatten for a face plate or simply use a drive spur.
Tom
 

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My faceplate is 3" and I was able to find a 3-1/8 forstner bit on Amazon for <$30 including shipping. Works fine, just make sure you eyeball it as close as posssibe before drilling on the drill press. You may need some shims to help position the log. Six big ol' long screws hold very well.

I do use a wormscrew but not for large sizes like you mentioned, I typically ony use the wormscrew 12" or under. Most of the time on <12" I use the pin jaws on my chuck instead of a wormscrew because there is no need to flatten the wood surface.
 

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Mount it between centers. Then you can adjust it up down, left right anyway you want until you get it the way you want it. Then just turn the outside of the bowl and put a tenon on it for your chuck. I do almost every bowl this way. Almost never use a screw chuck, faceplate, or regular chuck until I do this. I don't find it necessary to drill a hole for a chuck or to flatten one side using any tools. Just me, the lathe, a drive center, tail center and bowl gouge. Couldn't get any simpler and gives me the option of recentering if I find a defect I want to either get rid of or accentuate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Well I just turned the first bowl. I turned it between center using a drive spur. I did drill holes with a fostner bit for the drive spur and live center. The split log was long and as I said my BS is OOS. I was too lazy to round up my chain saw to trim it. I just turned it and had to remover a lot of wood. If I get a new computer today I will post pictures. The wood looks good but I don't think it's cherry. Thanks for all the help.
Tom
 

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TomC said:
Come on, I know you must know what a log split down the middle looks like! I currently have a computer problem and can't get on the net. I am using my iPad now. Tom
Of course I do but I just am a visual sort of guy and love having pictures in posts :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Can anyone tell me what this wood is. Looking at the end of the log I would think cherry. However, the guy that cut the tree down said he had never seen a wild cherry tree that big. Thanks
Tom
 

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How big was it?

It looks like cherry to me!
I don't know where you live but here in New York the cherry trees can get well over 2 feet across and over a 100 ft high in the woods. I know of a couple that are probably 3 ft wide or better
 
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