Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
885 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
so I have officially joined the cult with a nice lathe upgrade. It has already made a huge difference in the enjoyment factor. Like many of you I'm sure I could turn for hours. There are days tho that I would just as soon be outside with the chainsaw. Once I start in at the log pile and have the saw running well I figure I might as well cut a stack of blanks not just one or two to turn that day. So if I do that and then band saw them into rounds what should I do to keep them from checking. Wax dip? Leave them out in the weather? Kiln?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,257 Posts
Cut blanks are the hardest thing to save. Leave them in log form if you can however then you have bug problems to deal with and I haven't solved that problem yet.
The best bet is to put a tarp over the logs to keep them out of the weather. Sun and wind will make them split in no time. You will have to cut 3 to 6 inches off the end when you then cut a blank but they will last quite a while like this. The cheap blue tarps don't last long. I found a UV inhibitor tarp from www.TEKsupply.com that will hold up for a long time. I don't have the link anymore but call them or write them and they can give you the part #.
I don't store them this way for very long because I don't have the room to store logs very well and the bugs get in them pretty bad.
If you have the place to store the logs on concrete under a roof they will last the longest especially when covered to keep the sun and wind off of them.
So I cut the bowl blanks and seal them either 2 coats of Anchorseal or dip them in Parrafin wax that I melt in an electric skillet. Wax works the best in my tests and Anchorseal works better than all the cheaper alternatives. I have found that everyones environment is different so your results may vary depending on local. I use the electric skillet because the wax's flash point is 480 degrees so don't get it anywhere near a flame. The melting point is about 140 to 160 degrees, well below the flash point so I simply hot glue the temp dial on my skillet so it can't move. To do larger blanks I sit a coffee can in the skillet and fill it with wax. This I can carry to the larger blanks and paint the wax on.
For short term storage I simply cover the end grain areas. For longer term I cover the whole bowl blank. You still will occasionally lose a blank so it's good to check them regularly and turn any that start to crack, you'll just have to make a smaller bowl out of those.
The best bet by far is to rough turn the bowls and seal the end grain areas. Some can get buy with just stacking them in room with little air movement but I haven't had good luck doing that. Must be the weather in Tennessee.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
885 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks John,
I have a lot sitting in log form. I will try to get them more protected. Will also try the wax method as, like I said, if it's a good cutting day I would rather cut 10 or so rather than just the one bowl for that day.
By the way thanks for all your contributions to the forum. I have learned a lot from your posts. I got a Hercules because of you and I love it. Is there anything you think would be easier/ more efficient in the initial roughing out phases for bowls. I'm not doing much spindle work except for some tool handles an occasional light saber for my son.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,021 Posts
This is the way I store mine. I leave in log form but split through the pitch if over 6 or 7 inches diameter. Yeah, I know the small Holly split like crazy even though it is only 4-5". I only coat the ends and maybe one inch down on the saw cut with anchor seal.
I do like John suggested and leave them 4-6 longer than the diameter to leave enough to trim off checking. I have kept them over a year with no major problems.
I am lucky that I have a north facing shelter to put them under so they never get direct sun. A rack with a loose tarp may work as well.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
885 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Looks like I have options. I'll split some and wax some, and leave a log or two whole. Have any of you tried
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
885 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Oops- cut that off too soon.
Have any of you tried boiling your blanks to prevent cracking as they dry?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
I think the biggest thing that makes a difference is to cut the pith(center) out of the blank. When it comes to storage, what works for one may not work for another. I do almost nothing with my blanks and that works fine for me, but someone in a drier climate or different area may have to go to great lengths to preserve their wood.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top