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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I finally got to woodcraft and picked some stuff up.
I've been promising the lady a bookshelve for a few months now but I needed a dado set. All the pieces are ready I just needed to cut the joints.
*I picked up an 8" freud set

I also picked up a 3 piece router bit set for cabinet doors. (SWEET!!) I'm going to have to get a router with some more hp for the panel bit though.

And last I got a V-Notch Tongue and groove bit. The regular tongue and groove was kind of boring. It's a woodcraft brand but it seemed ok from looks. I tested it out this afternoon and I'm going to have to add a 1/8" cutter to it. The V is too deep in the 3/4 wood so it leaves a 1/8 straight before the v starts which is different looking but a bit too deep for me.
 

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Good Idea regarding the larger router for the panel bit, that things a bear. Before I got a larger router, I had to do panels in several passes. raising the height a bit each time. If your going to do alot of it, a shaper is the way to go.
 

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I have been using my table saw to raise panels lateley. Made a jig and it is so much faster than 3-4 passes on a router table. You do need to sand , but it is still faster and easier.
 

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Doors with routers?

Hey Jodiemeglio, if you plan on making doors regularly, reconsider the use of that panel raiser in your router. It is quite a side load on the bushings. I use a shaper for raising panels, done in two steps. The machine stays setup so there is no futsing with it when I need a door. The only adjustment I make is to the fence which is custom made (by me) for panel raising and has two set locations. Loosen two nuts, add or remove spacer, tighten two nuts and go. As to the rail and stile door frame, I have two routers dedicated to this. The tools are mounted in routers that lift out of the table and are never adjusted unless the tools are being replaced. Finally, I have a second shaper setup to machine the edges of the doors and drawers to match. Again, this is a dedicated setup so no adjustment is required. A small investment in money for a great time saver and time is the only thing out of my control.

Ed
 

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I agree that using big door raising bits in your router will definatly take a toll on the bearings, but I have been using the Freud panel reising kit in my 31/4 hp router and they work great. Granted, I am a serious hobbyist and make raised panel doors occasionally not daily. I have a shaper but rarely ever use it since manufactures came out with router bits to do the same task safely. My PC router is over ten years old and works as good today as when I purchased it. It has huge bearings and has been subjected to many large bits and a user that is not very patient with multiple passes when one pass will do. There are some great large robust routers out there that can handle lots of work from those of us that do not use them daily on a job sites.

Good luck on your decision and have fun.
 
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