Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,

Working on some silver maple that is still very wet. Tried taking off 1/64" with my new Bosch 1564 planner but all I'm getting is lots of grooves. The wood was rough cut in a sawmill. So my question is why and what can I do? I tried pushing it with light force, medium and heavy force and even tried a more aggressive cut. I also tried different directions. Is it me or a bad blade ? I made sure the blades were on tight and it wasn't a loose screw. Thanks!!
 

Attachments

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
28,995 Posts
It's like leveling a sand plie with a shovel

There is no registration point except the bottom of the tool and that is "floating" on the surface. A hand power planer is a difficult tool to make a flat surface without overlapping lines or marks.

It looks like you've done about as good as can be expected. A different method is called for now.... maybe a router on plank sliding on a set of parallel rails, a router sled.
 

·
(clever wood pun here)
Joined
·
979 Posts
There is no registration point except the bottom of the tool and that is "floating" on the surface. A hand power planer is a difficult tool to make a flat surface without overlapping lines or marks.

It looks like you've done about as good as can be expected. A different method is called for now.... maybe a router on plank sliding on a set of parallel rails, a router sled.
Here is a link to the method that woodnthings is referring to:

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f27/simple-router-planing-jig-48327/

I would imagine that you could build a similar jig for your handheld planer, but a router is really more effective for this. The important factor for making a flat, smooth surface is to have a flat reference. The handheld planer may be flat, but it is much shorter than the finished piece. Making this more challenging still, you have wet wood and are working on the end grain :censored:.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top