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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A buddy is moving across country to Seattle and gave me his powercraft lathe, face shield and very low end hf turning tools. I will probably take a class in the winter/spring, and likely won't touch it until then, but I'd like to read a book on turning technique, basics, etc. in the meantime. E.g. I know that I'd like to pick up some vintage turning tools so that I will have something that will hold and edge for more than 30 seconds, but out of all the variety of turning tools I don't know which are "basics" and what is used for what. An introductory book could tell me those things. I'd also be interested in any online resources you have found useful/credible/ worth recommending.

Thanks.
 

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Alan Sweet
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The web has tons of videos and..

there are a number of turning forums on the web also.

You tube has many basic videos that could be great learning aide.

Your best source is to find a turning guild or wood turners organization or wood workers guild with strong turners and lathes that could help you. For me the individual assistance has always been the best.

(BTW: I lived in Conn for 12 years. Stratford)
 

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+1 on a local turning club if there is one within driving distance.

Unlike hand planes, I do not think "vintage" turning tools are better than the best of todays offerings, such as Doug Thompson tools. His steel holds an edge longer than most.

For reading material, take a look at this thread.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/suggestions-reading-material-54458/

For preparation, take a look at this thread.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f6/where-start-53053/

Forum member John Lucas has a YouTube channel and excellent videos

https://www.youtube.com/user/john60lucas

Bob Hamilton has even more excellent videos on YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/user/bobham5
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks. There is a turning club nearby that does classes through Connecticut valley school of woodworking at the manchester woodcraft. I do plan on taking a class but want some background before then at least to satisfy my curiosity.

Thanks for the links. On a phone the sticky threads aren't sticky.

I will investigate the newer offerings though my main concern would be cost; vintage is fairly plentiful around here. I will check out newer prices.
 

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I will investigate the newer offerings though my main concern would be cost; vintage is fairly plentiful around here. I will check out newer prices.
Starting with the vintage is a good way to find out which tools you like to use.

There are many different kinds of skews, spindle gouges, bowl gouges, scrapers. If you can get a selection cheap it is worth doing. You will find some you like better than others.

You will need equipment to sharpen whatever tools you buy, unless you go for the replacement carbide tools.

Gary Gardner has a 6 part series on sharpening many types of woodworking tools. This is the first part, you should be able to find the others on YouTube from this one. Highly recommended.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ljhd_WbAOw
 
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