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Hey all just a question here for the group. I have always enjoyed working with wood but life got in the way with my enjoyment of it. Now at 57 life is getting out of my way so i can enjoy my wood working again. I have been making edge grain cutting boards out of walnut, white oak, red oak, and hickory all one inch rough cut boards dried for up to 15 years in my dads barn, cut to one and a quarter inch and planed down and glued up with titebond 111, bessey pipe clamps, then planed down again to a finished product of an inch to inch and an eighth thickness. Now my question, with no rhyme or reason to what strips of wood are used in the boards some have a slight warp to them after a few days while others do not and all are treated the same as far as storage after finished planing so what am i doing wrong? steve n tennessee thanks all
 

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Please go to the intro forum and introduce yourself to the very nice folks here - and welcome!

As for your problem... if you're using the same stalk, my guess is that the warped ones have boards running in the same direction while the stable ones have alternating grain. Take some pictures for us to show us what happened. Take a picture of the end grains - they tell us a lot!
 

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realize that an unfinished board can warp just by laying on a tabletop for a day. moisture can come and go on the exposed surface, but not the surface underneath against the table. this difference in moisture from one face to the other can cause warp - quickly. flip the board over and it will often come back.

even though it dried in the barn, if you brought it indoors, there is a climate difference.

also the same reason you want to always finish both faces of a project with same amount of sealer.
 
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