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I think I follow what you are describing. You are going with what you originally said the cleat size should be and providing a uniform platform around. The support sister joists are included only from left to right attached to the original joists (lengthwise) but not included across the width. The platform is bigger than your previous thought (1 7/8")

I think your description: "Take a 1" x 4" (3/4" x 3 1/2") 10 feet long
Cut 2 pieces 20 3/4" long and 2 pieces 19 1/4" for the width.
Install the cleats across the width first."

means the following to me

First prepare the cleats as follows: Take a 1" x 4" (3/4" x 3 1/2") 10 feet long.

Cut 2 pieces 20 3/4" (long cleats) and 2 pieces 19 1/4" for the wide cleats.............

Am I following your thoughts properly?

EMIL
 

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Yes, so far

Screw the wide ones on first. Then put your support 2 x 4 or 2 x underneath. attach them up snug to the bottom of the cleats.
Measure for the long cleats. It may be a tad off from the dimension so work from the actual distance. then fit the long cleats on top screw them down.
Now you should have a "platform" under the opening to support the new subfloor "patch". When you screw down the patch use screws long enough to penetrate the cleats all the way through and into the 2 x 4. ;) bill
 

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Discussion Starter #23
I understand your new elegant design, a modification of the earlier one. One reservation that I have is the elimination of the 2 x 4 at the LH and RHS. I wonder if it would give more strength if they were included.

Now I had better explain the project I am doing below the sub floor. I have not done as yet, since it would complicate matters too much.
It may necessitate somewhat a rework of above wood structure design. The project is not to repair rotting joists.

I have found out that this shower had no liner so I had to remove the existing drain. The project is to fit new plumbing below the sub floor of a shower : to be fitted is a P trap plus connective piping downstream. Upstream to be fitted to the P trap is a rising pipe and just above the rising pipe there is to be a 4 1/2" diameter hole in the new plywood sub floor section. Hence the plywood sub floor will have have the 4 1/2 hole in it.

I attach photos of the (a) sub floor cavity, (b) plus previous drawing with 4 1/2" hole included in the new sub floor section (c) drawing of p trap to be included.

Now first the p trap will be attached to the existing drain pipe and then the P trap will be clamped to the exiting base just below the sub floor. The potion of the base of the p trap is shown marked in pencil in the photo. Then the rising pipe will be glued into place. I need to immobilize the rising pipe and p trap below the sub floor so that I can fit the shower drain above the new sub floor through the 4 1/2" hole in the new sub floor into the rising pipe from the p trap. I need to have the rising pipe (and P trap) well-immobilized. Now I need some suggestions on how best to do this. I am thinking of how to clamp it to the wood structure. I have a metal strap coil and clips. I may have to add another perpendicular piece of wood from back to front and close to the rising pipe; and anchor rising pipe to it.

Now on top of the shower floor there will be some roofing felt and there will be cement mud added and layered with a pitch to constitute a shower prepan. The prepan will surround the shower drain, but will not support it. Previously when I did this before in a basement project the rising pipe was already embedded in concrete. There was no plywood sub floor per se.

The question arises as to whether the proposed wood structure is OK to accommodate the hole in the sub floor and this project. Or do we need more support

Also how to immobilize the P trap and rising pipe to wood structure

Any more details needed please ask;

EMIL
 

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Old School
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Now I had better explain the project I am doing below the sub floor. I have not done as yet, since it would complicate matters too much.
It may necessitate somewhat a rework of above wood structure design. The project is not to repair rotting joists.
EMIL
From this thread:
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f16/posting-question-4-nubies-others-9786/
:eek: POSTERS, Give all pertinent details, woods used, tools available, dimensions, spans, thickness, tool model and brands etc. when asking a Question.....You may want to Search this site before posting to get an idea of what others have encountered. There is a wealth of information here and folks are willing to spend their valuable time answering a well thought out question.The answer will be only as good as the question. TO AVOID ANY CONFUSION, POST A SKETCH OR PHOTO. The toolbar has FAQ's to answer how to post "attachments" just follow the instructions. This will help everyone to fully understand your question and you will insure getting an answer that is useful. Digital cameras are cheaper than goats milk these days and would be a valuable addition to record your success :yes: or failures! :no:..bill







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Here is a better description of this project: I have an upstairs shower. It has been necessary to remove a rectangular section of the sub floor and to remove the shower P trap. Below the sub floor there is a sheet of thin plywood. Below is the ceiling of the living room. So the only way to access the plumbing from below is to remove some dry wall and that piece of thin plywood.

Advice has been received from woodnthings regarding building a support platform all the way around the rectangular hole in the sub floor. {This will support the new wood sub floor rectangle when it is slotted into place (see drawing). This will be implemented.

Now a new P trap is to be installed (drawing has one) and a riser pipe put in place (drawing has one). At this point the new plywood with a 4 1/2" hole is to be put in place on the hole. The base of the P trap can be clamped to the thin plywood. I am thinking how best to immobilize the P trap and the riser pipe. I am concerned that after the new plywood rectangle with the 4 1/2" hole is put in place that I have to secure the shower drain in place to the riser pipe with a clamp or straps. I am thinking to add a block of wood between the 2' x 4" (perpendicular to the joists) close to the riser pipe and clamp the riser pipe to it. The riser pipe will be 5 1/2" from the 2" x 4 " new wood (at rear drawing) and 9 1/2" from the front 2" x 4".

Any thoughts on this predicament
 

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