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I,m gluing up a big block 28"x55" should I do it in 4 sections or keep adding on to the first 7"
 

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It's a butchers block but to big to glue at one time.It's 3" thick x28"wx55"using 1" slats so there are 28 pieces all together.Never glued up a big piece like this .
 

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Pianoman
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First off I hope the pieces you are gluing up are 3and 1/4"s. Hope you have a thickness planer... and how wide is it? Glue as many as you can fit through your planer...planing them to 3 and 1/8th"s... dry fit all sections glued...join to fit flat!!!! Once all sections are glued....look to hier a wide belt sanding machine... or do it the old way....Two men (or women) using a flat 4"x6" beam with sandpaper glued to it.
 

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wow, pianoman. I'd say that's good advice, but quite possibly overkill. You're the professional though, so I won't argue your way is better than what I'll suggest.

Personally, I'd glue the table up as wide as I could clamp it. Dry fitting is an important factor. Once you've got it glued up you can either use a hand planer (power) or the old fashioned way to plane/sand it smooth. I say I'd do it this way because I don't have a thickness planer, and I know where I might be able to get a hand planer for rent for a couple hours. All I have at home is a ROS and some semi-decent hand planes but you won't end up with quite as even a thickness if you do it this way. I have a "butcher block" table (it's really just a cutting board mounted on a carcass) that's only 3/4 inch thick and definitely isn't even thickness throughout that I made using my technique. Pianoman's suggestion is the right choice if you have the tools available. I don't so I improvise.
 

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That's some butcher block. If you have adequately long clamps do it all at one shot. You will have to clamp the pieces down, as well as across to prevent the whole thing from developing a twist. Then go at it with a good hand plane, or build yourself a jig for your router and level it that way. Finish it up with a belt sander.

Gerry
 

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Old School
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The cross pieces to clamp up for alignment are called cauls. You could glue up as many as you feel comfortable with, but it's difficult to keep them from sliding around.

I would not put a hand power plane to the stock as it is a quick way to fudge it up. Unless you have a lot of experience with a belt sander, that's another way to get out of whack. Hand plane to flatness.






 

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It's a butchers block but to big to glue at one time.It's 3" thick x28"wx55"using 1" slats so there are 28 pieces all together.Never glued up a big piece like this .
I have glued up counters that size before. One important factor is the set-up time of the glue. I use Titebond II, and I have to work pretty darn fast. If you cannot apply and spread glue over 27 surfaces of that size within 10 minutes, then I would suggest doing it in 2 or 3 seperate sections.
The ones I have done were 2 3/8" thickness, finishing with a 2" thickness. I shell out to run them through a wide belt sander at another cabinet shop. It is SO WORTHWHILE. Unless you just want the joy and satisfaction of spending many hours planing that thing. If that's the case, more power to you.
A couple of suggestions: use cauls as has been mentioned to keep the slats even, but lay a strip of wax paper between the cauls and your block, or the cauls will be glued to your surface; don't let your pipes be in contact with the surface of the wood while drying-they will leave black stains on the wood where glue gets trapped between the pipes and the wood. Again, you can use wax paper strips to prevent this.
 
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