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where's my table saw?
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31,299 Posts
It wouldn't scare me

It's the teeth on the blade that cut, and the workpiece doesn't contact the blade plate, because of the set to the teeth. I think the silicone "scare" is exaggerated and I know that will ruffle all kinds of feathers and raise the hair on the back on necks all over the forum.
I use silicone spray on the table surfaces of my jointer and table saw occasionally. and it makes a world of difference in the "stiction" of the workpiece, which gets sanded eventually. I would like to see a scientific study of the amount of silicone that gets transfered from a working surface to a workpiece..... :yes: I think it's negligible, but I could be wrong....again.... :blink:
 

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John
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3,028 Posts
I don't know if it's wrong, risky or whatever. There are just so many lubrication options out there, why risk it? I usually just give my blade a coat of Johnsons Paste Wax after cleaning. Not sure if that's better or worse but haven't had any problems to date.
 

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Really underground garage
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2,552 Posts
There isn't many things more frustrating than fisheye and solvent pop.When it happens,some folks go off the deep end and patently refuse to have silicone(fisheye)anywhere near their work environs.

Trying to put a persons/shop "tolerance" on a scale is rather awkward.I will say that we rarely have it in the millshop(wood).WD40 is used a little in machine shop,mainly as a cleaning agent......but has certain properties whilst machining aluminum.But even then,theres other cutting fluids that work better.

To use it,or anything on a saw blade that is going to "gum" up when evaporation and dust settles in,does seem to be backward thinking......irregardless(haha) of whether it's a contaminate.I've been using Pam as a lubricant on BS blades in some pretty tough woods.I'm under the assumption you can eat Pam,so was a little more relaxed about its contaminating.And I'm talking maybe just a lite wipedown.
 

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1,239 Posts
So I was surfing the web for what people are using for cleaning blades.....and Woodcraft of all places is recommending using silicone spray on your blades........am I the only one that finds that wrong??

http://www.woodcraft.com/Articles/Articles.aspx?articleid=262
this is how i clean my blades, for yrs and no problum, i use greese lighting brand name and spray on the blade and scrub with a little brissel brush , this get's every bit of pitch bild up off and than i wash the blade in hot water , and wipe dry and spray with T-9 and it is good as new, now some say that that clener affect's the weld of the teeth , but so far after yrs of use none have came off, blade is still good as new my 2 cent's some use simple green also
 

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I read somewhere that Mean Green was great for cleaning blades, I use it around the house for other things and it works great so I bought a gallon jug of it at the Dollar store but have not tried it yet. I snatched a old pie tin from DW a few years ago to soak blades in for cleaning, now just need to try with the Mean Green.
 

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John
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3,028 Posts
The only cleaners I've heard of that affect the bits & blades are the caustic sodas, ie oven cleaners. Freud did a study some years back and found it attacked the carbide. This will likely get a rise out of some who claim to have used the stuff for years and years, but, on the off chance Freud might be right, I avoid those. I figure I have a heck of a lot more $$$ tied up in bits and blades than I do cleaning solutions. Besides, I bought a quart of the Rockler bit and blade cleaner about 3 years ago for $10 and am still using it. The quart mixes with a gallon of water and doesn't go bad so when I need to soak something I just use that. For spot cleanups I keep a spray bottle of Trend cleaner on hand. :smile:
 
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