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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone shed some light on Black Walnut prices? The logs I'm looking at range from 18" to 20" and 15' to 18' long with hardly any sap wood.
 

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Much depends on your customers and location.
It also depends on if the customers are looking for a lot of wild character in the wood or straight laced straight grained stock.
Also your location matters. If walnut is abundant in your area, likely the bd.ft. price will be lower.

I pay around $6.00 a bdft. for wild grained live edge stock, sometimes fully dried and sometimes partially.
 

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Much depends on your customers and location.
It also depends on if the customers are looking for a lot of wild character in the wood or straight laced straight grained stock.
Also your location matters. If walnut is abundant in your area, likely the bd.ft. price will be lower.

I pay around $6.00 a bdft. for wild grained live edge stock, sometimes fully dried and sometimes partially.
I agree- it depends on location and tree quality.............
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Looks like I'm getting a good deal then two walnut logs and one ash all veneer. I'm just hauling to the mill all for $150.
 

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Looks like I'm getting a good deal then two walnut logs and one ash all veneer. I'm just hauling to the mill all for $150.
Who said they are veneer and how much is the mill giving you?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
A friend of mine has a portable mill, he was doing it as a profession till the market crashed he also told me the logs are veneer but he has been out of the game for awhile that is why I was asking what the going rate is now.
 

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As I understand it, you plan to haul the logs to a mill and sell them for $150? How far are you from the mill, and what equipment do you have to haul them? If they are veneer, cutting any of them to the wrong length will drastically reduce the value of the logs, so you might want to talk to the buyer at the mill first. To get an idea of the board footage, measure the diameter of the log at the small end, and plug that number, plus the length of the log into a board foot calculater (there are several on the web), using the Doyle scale. Then, at least you can talk the log buyer's language when you discuss selling the logs. The Youtube video, by the way, is more than just humor. The issues of metal in the log, as well as the experience required to mill and market the lumber are all very real. As a logger and sawmill operator, I run into this scenario more often than you might think.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I bought the logs for 150 and the guy who owns the mill didn't charge me. The lumber looks great, 9'&8' as of now I'm keeping the lumber. I ended up getting 210 bf of walnut and 170 bf of ash.
 

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You got a sweet deal :thumbsup:! Hope you find a way to express your appreciation to the sawyer. I did a free job (couple hundred board feet) a while ago, and was very pleased to get a gift of a half-gallon of wild honey (also a sweet deal), plus some good referrals for some paying jobs.
 
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