Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello there, My name is Luc.
Last year I purchased a house with a large wood shop that contained palate of rough sawn black walnut wood. I had never touched saw before in my life, but it was just laying there so I decided I was going to try to build something (my wife decided it was to be a bed and a couple months later she now has one).
Here is a photo of the finished product:





some detailed shots:






 

·
Registered
Joined
·
834 Posts
Looks like you might have found a new hobby!:thumbsup:

The bed looks great!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,439 Posts
Very nice bed. Beautiful craftsmanship. Must be a heck of a house too. That is some fancy crown molding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
That's some nice work, and a real inspiration for new woodworkers. If you could elaborate on how you did the posts and trim. Explaining the joints and any difficulties you had would benefit others that attempt a project like that.

yeah I can do that:



First I planed and squared 20 boards ~10 ft x10"x1.5



Then cut 16 (4 for each post) of them at just over 6ft long and selected them to distribute thickness and have most beautiful boards on outside.

Then I cut notches in 8 of them, taking care to account for handedness of the posts and how I wanted it to fit together when completed. (hard to describe bu this took some time but you need to make sure this is done correctly or the bed won't go together as I intended it to ; like lego. Everything just slides into a slot on the post exactly the same width as the board so all weight force is distributed vertically on the post)

There is probably an easier way of cutting these notches other than making 50 verticals with a table saw (i'm open to suggestions for next time).



I glued them together with titebond III and clamps and flipped one during the gluing so the notch was in the wrong side. (don't do this it makes one very angry upon realization and you will spend 2 hours plugging the hole and creating a new hole on the other side with a Dremmel)





Then put the whole post through the planer until all 4 are same size and you have remover the excess glue and overhangs. Each post ended up at 6ft long 6"x4.5" thick and weighed 40lbs per. If i could have done it over I would have had someone help me lift these things through the planer. Passing 40 lbs of awkward through the planer over 100 times is hard on the back. Plus you want this to be as perfect as possible because any uneveness or bump will translate over when you router the edges and mine thus
have some imperfections.

For the crown moulding I cut 4 rectangles out of a 1 1/4" board sized to overhang of the end of the post a full inch and then routered around the entire rectangle with a bit with 3/4" depth resulting in a 1/4" overhang.
I repeated this process with 4 more rectangles 1" larger than the previous. Then glued/clamped them together 1 large 1 small.
Then glued/clamped the crown moulding on top of the post.




I then laid them on a table and hand routered the sides in my chosen pattern:




I now did a mock assembly and cut the running and headboards to the mattress size post to post.









I then assembled the bed in the paint booth and glued supports on to the running boards:











I also made a centre support by gluing together 3 pine boards. I think this will hold the mattress plus 2 people although I really have no experience in gluing stuff. I am still surprised that the wood bond is stronger than anything I could screw together. In reality this whole bed has only 2 screws on each running board end to hold it laterally from sliding out of the joint. It is quite easy to assemble and disassemble



Glued Moulding on footboard and headboards.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
Luc,

That looks like you hit a home run on your first at bat.
Looks like you caught on pretty quick.
Did you have a teacher along the way?
Just curious where you are located.
I am amazed that you bought a house with the tooling and materials in place.
We all wish we could be as fortunate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Luc,

That looks like you hit a home run on your first at bat.
Looks like you caught on pretty quick.
Did you have a teacher along the way?
Just curious where you are located.
I am amazed that you bought a house with the tooling and materials in place.
We all wish we could be as fortunate.
I did not have a teacher, in fact I had a single mom so I really didn't get any exposure to tools etc growing up. However the stuff is here and the house wasn't completely finished so I am learning out of necessity.

I just assemble things in my mind and then try to figure out how to use the tools I have to do what I want to achieve. I am a dentist so analytical problem solving comes quite naturally. Although I do have issues knowing what can be done with specific tools. A friend of mine the other day told me I could just push the piece of wood against the router bit freehand as long as it has a bearing on the end of it LOL. That's how I did the crown moulding on the pillars.

I am located in New Brunswick Canada.

That's some incredible work for what experience you have. You bought a house that had a wood shop? Was all the tools and machinery there?

No, he took most of his nice stuff with him. It looked like this before:



The only tools that wre left were a bandsaw that I can't get to work a radial arm saw that doesn't cut straight and some clamps. The wood was nice though.



I bought a table saw: (I'm gonna need a truck if I keep this up).



Router:









The garage is awesome 50'x40' with a 22'x30' extension and a loft. Paint booth, wood shop, hydraulic lift included.












 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top