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Cabinet Maker
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Discussion Starter #1
So I got a lathe for Christmas and have just been making some little ornaments ( easy to make and fun:smile: ) with maple which is working great. what wood do you use, or think would work good I'd like to hear what you have to say, thanks.
 

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Well... apple, pear, plum, persimmon, osage, mulberry, cherry, walnut, ash, hickory, oak, redbud, crabapple, box elder, sycamore, buckeye, birch, pecan, catalpa, hackberry, dogwood, honeylocust, holly, juniper, cedar, sweetgum, elm, sassafras, willow, lilac, cypress, would be a place to start if you are asking what I have used :laughing:.(off the top of my head)

I have said this before, it's all good turning(except maybe cottonwood :huh:). I have dragged some of the best turning stock in the state out of burn piles. Look around, its everywhere.

I don't know if you live in town or the country. If you live in the boonies, take a walk in the woods with a bow saw and a burlap sack. Pick up some downed stuff and give it a spin (you don't have to cut anything alive, there is plenty laying around).

If you live in town, better yet. There are non native "ornamentals" growing in peoples yards as well as species native to your region. If you see a tree service working ask if you can have a couple little limbs to work with. If you are polite and stay out of their way when they work, they will gladly give you some.

You don't even need a bunch of tools to make turning stock. A bow saw to cut them to length and you can split/cut out blanks with a hatchet and a mallet.
 

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I have found that the lighter colored woods show up better on the Christmas tree than the darker woods do. Darker colored wood for accents is Ok. Remember that fruit woods crack badly as they dry so handle them accordingly.
 

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Cabinet Maker
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Discussion Starter #4
alright thanks for the tips, this summer there was a bad storm that went through my Grandpa's farm with big oak trees and maple trees coming down I'd like to this spring possibly get some oak logs and such we'll see what there is.
 

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Just call me Sir
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You grab all the wood you can get, if its just fell then wax it up and get it all stored up, it takes around a year an inch to dry, you could run it through a bandsaw and board it, stick and stack it, just look ahead you just never know what you are going to be making, its always good to have stuff drying, you can always swap with others, and there is always green turning, never pass up the chance of free wood. And even small branch woods around an inch come in for finials and alsorts of turning parts. My chainsaws love a day out:thumbsup: ...LB
 

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Great to hear you got a lathe!:thumbsup: Have a happy 60years of turning!As for the wood,I heard sycamore is easy to turn and figured sy is beautiful.Walnut too.
 
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