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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hopefully, the attached pictures reflect my problem. Both tenons have broken off on the left rocker arm. There is also a similar problem with the front lateral support piece.

It seems to me they are too small in diameter to attempt drilling and inserting dowels, but that may be the only resort??

Note: The entire rocker system bolts onto the bottom of the seat. Can the entire rocker assembly be purchased somewhere??

This chair has sentimental value to a family member, and I'm not an expert woodworker - just the one the family brought the chair to!!:icon_smile:
Any suggestions/advice would be deeply appreciated.:eek:
 

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Welcome to the club. Can you enlarge the pictures? They are so small I can't see any details. Unless the company is still in business and still making the rocker you wouldn't be able to buy parts for it. You might find some that had an antique repair shop that could re-make the parts but before you go down that road I would like to see if you can repair the parts.
 

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The rocker can be rebored out and have the dowel replaced. It's usually easier to find the correct center with a brad point drill bit. If it were me I would go to the next size dowel if possible. The one shown looks a little small for the application. It actually looks like someone took a chair and made a rocker out of it. Normally they turn a dowel on the leg as part of the leg for a rocker. Someone may have just cut the dowel off and replaced it. If you can find a hardwood dowel like oak or maple it would probably hold up better. When you drill the hole for the dowel put some masking tape around the drill bit as a guide for how deep to drill the hole. That way you won't drill all the way through the rocker and will have holes of uniform depth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Per Steve & Cabinetman, I'll give it a go, as they say. Thanks for the instructions!

One last question: The second or "bottom" picture reflects the other issue with the chair. The horizontal support piece going across the back has done the same thing. You can see one end has also broken off. How can I get the other end out so I can put it in a vice for the doweling process?? Do you just continue to tap with a rubber mallet, or is there a liquid I can soak the solid end with?

By the way, all of these broken joints appear to have been tenons, rather than dowels. I think they just got skimpy with the stock??
 

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One last question: The second or "bottom" picture reflects the other issue with the chair. The horizontal support piece going across the back has done the same thing. You can see one end has also broken off. How can I get the other end out so I can put it in a vice for the doweling process?? Do you just continue to tap with a rubber mallet, or is there a liquid I can soak the solid end with?

By the way, all of these broken joints appear to have been tenons, rather than dowels. I think they just got skimpy with the stock??
Try a heat gun. You may be able to wiggle it out. Or, it may take some urging with a rubber mallet. Many production chair machinery is set up for tenons, and not dowels. At least with tenons there is one fixed end.




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