Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking into buying a new scrollsaw just wondering which brand and model would be the best for my buck. Thanks Jason
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Here's a recent review of the Dremel SS on LumberJocks - http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/18 - looks like a pretty good unit. I have a Delta variable speed that I am happy with. I saw a Dewalt at HD with a really big table that looked nice too. Make sure you have a blower, don't buy a cheap one with pin-type blades, and you should do pretty well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
266 Posts
DeWalt DW788 20" variable speed - other than an Excalibur, this one seems to be the "gold standard" for scrollers.
And Artisan blades are probably the best around.

I have the DW788 and I LOVE it. Very smooth, easy to change blades, and does a great job.

Nancy
 

·
Senior Member Grandpa
Joined
·
349 Posts
I started out with one of the cheap pin type saws because I thought I couldn't afford a good saw. After many frustrations I purchased a Dewalt DW788VS around 3 years ago and love it. It's not as high as a RBI or a Hegner but has a really easy to use clamp system. Only one minor problem and it was a easy and low cost repair so can't fault that. I use it alot. Have some work in My Gallery and hope to upload some unfinished pieces I am working on in the near future. Biggest thing is don't scrimp on blades. You get what you pay for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
I started with a pin-type too and it was a complete waste of time and money.

Here are some tips from an article on Woodcraft...

http://www.woodcraft.com/articles.aspx?articleid=264&page=2

Points To Check On A Scroll Saw
1. Check throat size: if you are going to be doing a lot of work that requires deep cuts, don't buy a 15" or 16" throat saw, but, instead, check first 20" saws.
2. Check motor power: scroll saws are not high amperage or horsepower tools, but they do need enough power to cut through moderately thick, or padded (stacked) stock. Look for at least 1.25 amperes.
3. Check for variable speed. Being able to vary the speed makes many cuts easier to control. Generally, ranges can run from 450 to 1600 or so RPMs.
4. Check for table size and construction. The table needs to be large enough to support the work the throat will accept. This varies widely, but generally the larger table the better. The table should be machined flat.
5. Check for dust blower and dust collection hook-ups. At the least, a dust blower is needed.
6. Check for table tilt. The table needs to tilt 45º to one side, and doing so to both sides is better.
7. Check for ease of blade changes. Tool free is best. A lift-away top arm, as with the DeWalt DW788, is a big help, too, in work where it is necessary to pierce the work often.
8. Check for control location. Up-front is best. You don't want to have to wiggle a hand under the table to change speeds or shut the machine down.
9. Check for vibration. Less is much better.
10. Check for noise. Again, less is better.
Those ten points will give you a scroll saw that does what you want it to do when you want it done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for all the info. I will have to print out the ten points to look for. looks as though everyone likes the Dewalt. I will do a little research and then spend some money.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Thanks for posting this. I have a 16" variable speed Ryobi scroll saw. I've been tring to cut out toy cars from a pattern that uses 1 3/4" wood and I've gone through blades like you couldn't imagine. I know in part that it's me because I just got back into woodworking recently and I'm a bit rusty, but, I didn't think that I would use up that many blades.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top