Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I ran a search and didn't find this question, its a basic newbie question so I am sure I am not the first to ask.

I normally put together my jigs with whatever scrap I have available. I am into a multiple piece project that involves a slight taper to the legs. I put together a jig for the table saw to make the cuts, but it only lasted through 3 sets of legs.

Because this is a cut that I will be repeating over and over, I have decided to buy some better material to build the jig. I thought poplar would be fine for the guide and fence portion, but I am looking for suggestions for the base material. I will screw and glue this together, I am looking for a material that will slide well on the table. I want to use a material that will hold up to clamping and re-clamping over and over again but not have to be so thick. For the first jig I used 1/4 inch oak ply, which I have a bunch of, but it is far to thin to hold up to the stress.
 

·
John
Joined
·
3,028 Posts
+1 on the Baltic birch ply. Second choice would be 1/2" MDF but MDF would need several coats of boiled linseed oil and allowed to cure for a few days to develop the hard, slick finish.:smile:
 
  • Like
Reactions: Dodger52

·
Really underground garage
Joined
·
2,552 Posts
More than likely out of your shop's production profile?.......Noting,there's a huge difference making 10's and 20's of a part and making 100+.And is the reason for response.

It takes a smart designer to know when fixturing,exactly how far we want to go.Not only with the purse strings,but time as well.

Having said that.....and still barely scratching the surface,there are times when a nice slab of 1/2" thick,aluminum plate can really pay off.It can be drilled/tapped very quickly to accommodate almost endless jigs from one pce.Another is a nice slab of plastic(Delrin,HDPE,nylon,ect.).Shipping the above can get costly....see or ask around if there's a supplier near you.You're looking for a friend in the biz that can possibly steer "drops" your way.

You'll have to be smart about it though.Going to a larger CNC shop prolly isn't going to find many drops.They spend "good money" on fixturing,usually ordering custom cut pcs......amortizing the cost over 1000's of parts.Instead,you need to find a "supply" house.....one that in fact,does custom work.Thats where you'll find drops.Good luck.
 

·
John
Joined
·
3,028 Posts
Just out of curiosity, any idea why your first jig "failed"? I'm having a hard time picturing a taper jig failing very easily once constructed.. Pic of your old one might help.:blink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,644 Posts
I bought a half sheet (5' x 5') of 1/2" Baltic Birch recently from my local lumber supplier. I am slowly using it up. @ $37 it wasn't too expensive. Here is a pic of my new drill press table made from two pieces of the 1/2" BB glued together and laminated with white Formica. It looks really good in person.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Just out of curiosity, any idea why your first jig "failed"? I'm having a hard time picturing a taper jig failing very easily once constructed.. Pic of your old one might help.:blink:
Here is a pic...




Its not hard to believe it failed once you see it... I really did throw it together from some scrap. The screws holding the "guide" are pulling through the base. After solving that I am sure that the "clamps" which have to be tightened with a screwdriver are the next to fail. I have ordered some hardware that will replace the "clamps" and provide adequate pressure to hold the leg in place. The replacement will have a larger block to handle the piece. I Have three different sizes of legs to cut so I thought I would make a stop with a dowel attached that would fit into a hole for each of the three sizes.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top