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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got a "new" 36" Steel entry door from my PT job at the local "Orange box"..... Problem is my door measures 35 5/8" and the steel is 35 7/8"

I'm thinking it's easier to build a new Jamb to hang it in than try and salvage the old one......

thoughts??

The door was a Display and has about 6-8 holes on the Interior face (top and bottom) easy fix..... Considering it's a 300+ dollar door and I got it for 20 bucks...........
 

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I would say you could make it out of anything you want just be sure to prime it on all four sides and a good oil based exterior paint to protect it from the weather.

Stay away from Pb or other such material of course.
 

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They sell a jamb kit for doors at those stores.
It's usually pine, but any tight grained wood will work.
Poplar would be my first choice, it's more insect resistent
and paints well.:icon_cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I looked at HD last night... and the Kits are all 5/4 stock which will be too thick...... Even the Never rot stuff...............

Yep planned on Avoiding PB & MDF.............. Looks like Pine it might be.... Unless I can get over to the "real" Lumber store and See what he has instock..........
 

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Why would the 5/4 jambs be too thick? Remove a piece of the existing door casing, and you will see that there is space between the "rough" opening width and the width of the door jambs. The new jambs will also be kerfed and have nice weatherstripping installed, much better than any type of nail on stuff. But do seal them, particularily the end grain with a couple of coats of good oil primer, they are not made of any particularly rot resistant wood, The "jamb saver" is a nice upgrade for a few dollars more. My first choice if you have to build is #1 kiln dried PT pine, obviously not a "big box" item. Stay away from poplar, it makes great interior trim because it paints so well, but it has no rot resistence.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
OK.. i remeasured the ones at HD... they Finish at 1 1/4" thick. the original jambs are 3/4 with (Pushing barely) 1/4" worth of shim gap. that's only 1"........... I really don't wanna tear into the framing consiering it's an exterior wall................... Yeah I Could plane them down...... but then I'd have to re do the relief on the backside as well....
 

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Okay, I know everybody is going to think this is tacky, but given the space limitation, have you considered laminating a set of door jambs up out of stock? It would save a lot of planing, and I agreee, you don't want to start ripping out the wall framing on an exterior wall if you can avoid it.

Gerry
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I cna use 3/4 for the main jamb as that's what the old one is.... it's just 1/4" to narrow in the inside for the new door....... I Just wans't sure if Pine would work or not......... it just seems to move an awful lot
Poplar is my Next choice....... I have no problem Building the jamb towhat I need... t's just the Kits are too big for what I need and work out to be more than the Lumber would be if I was to make it myself.... I'd live to use the Never rot one....... but spending 50 or 60 bucks on it then having to rework it seems a bit of a waste
 

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Since you have to take the old jamb out.
Don't remake the sides,, just make the top and bottom pieces longer (if the hinge mortice's are in the same location).
jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well it won;t hurt to redo the Knod side as it's a bit beat up anyway.... and the new door will require 3 hinges not 2 as it's heavier. figured I might as wekk do it all..............
 
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