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Discussion Starter #1
Hi. I'm making a dining table and the guy I'm making it for wants legs attached to the very corners, like the photo I've attached. I'm wondering what the best type of joint / fastener is for a result like this?

*The legs will be made of 4x4s and the table top will be 8/4 inch thick.

All is made of walnut.

Thank you.
 

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I would cut a ½" thick x ¾" long tenon on the table side of the "L" cut out to be mortised into the leg. Even with that, it's not going to be the strongest of joints as there is a lot of leverage down near the bottom of the leg. Without any other details to be added to the table design, that limits the choices.









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Discussion Starter #4
reply to your message

Thanks for replying! Did you mean by "notch", that I should cut two rabbet edges along two of the top sides on my legs?
 

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I don't wihs to offend anyone here.I understand that this site contains complete newcomers to WW as far as pro's.Thjs site as far as I can see is a discussion of WW and to get advice from more seasoned ww so everyone can learn and get new ideas?
With that being said.I do not understand where someone with no idea of joinery and structural integrety of various joints could be selling their products.
If I'm out of line here ,I'm sure someone will let me know shortly,Maybe I should have opened another thread on this topic.It is not directed to the OP but his post did make me think of it.
Owned a custom shop for 14 years and had 2 mil liability insurance that I paid dearly for .If I built a piece that was structurally sound and it came apart and injuired a person,ontop of bfeeling bad about it,they would have owned me or my business.
Just my thoughts.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
No worries. You're totally entitled to say whatever you want. Just to let you know, I only build stuff for friends. And I do have an idea of how I'll build it, but I was just looking for any tips that people may have as I want to build my buddy the best table possible.
 

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moving out of the box perhaps... but what about some sort of longer piece of metal concealed into the joint? say... an L shape with 6" long legs... cut a channel in the wood leg just wide and long enough to lay the metal into it, use epoxy or some other strong adhesive to secure the L Iron into that channel and then replace the surface of the inside of the leg, sand it flush.

Then drill a whole for the other end of the L into the table board. The iron would be invisible save for the 6" grain variation on the upper inside of the leg that you plugged... Sort of like a dowel... if the dowel were made of iron and went into the leg and took a 90 degree turn downward to have more bite. That would be a deceptively strong joint with that in there I would think...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
bauerbach — great idea, though I was thinking of using a concealed corner bridle joint, taking a mortise out of the leg and pinning it.

Does anyone else think this sounds ok? I'm definitely no pro.
 

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To answer your question directly after my rant.I would may cut a floating tenneon that goes around the corner.It would tale minimal tools and be a good joint.I would also put an apron on the table to support it better.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks Mako1! A floating tennon is a great idea. What do you mean by "that goes around the corner" when you refer to it? Do you mean that it would insert diagonally?

Unfortunately my bud doesn't want an apron. I wish he did!

Thanks so much for your help. I really appreciate it.
 

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I don't wihs to offend anyone here.I understand that this site contains complete newcomers to WW as far as pro's.Thjs site as far as I can see is a discussion of WW and to get advice from more seasoned ww so everyone can learn and get new ideas?
With that being said.I do not understand where someone with no idea of joinery and structural integrety of various joints could be selling their products.
If I'm out of line here ,I'm sure someone will let me know shortly,Maybe I should have opened another thread on this topic.It is not directed to the OP but his post did make me think of it.
Owned a custom shop for 14 years and had 2 mil liability insurance that I paid dearly for .If I built a piece that was structurally sound and it came apart and injuired a person,ontop of bfeeling bad about it,they would have owned me or my business.
Just my thoughts.
+1. :yes: That's fairly common. Forums flourish with knowledgeable individuals, both hobbyists and professionals. It's also common for hobbyists with little knowledge take on a major project. When reading some threads and posts, there are professionals with limited knowledge and experience giving advice that should have been evaluated before offering it as a proper and fitting method.

I too carried high liability limits and product liability insurance. Truth be known, is that even with a giveaway there is liability, hobbyist or professional.

No worries. You're totally entitled to say whatever you want. Just to let you know, I only build stuff for friends. And I do have an idea of how I'll build it, but I was just looking for any tips that people may have as I want to build my buddy the best table possible.
There are those circumstances that the client (or in your case a friend) should be advised up front of the pros and cons of any structural anomalies that may exist with a perceived design. If someone is presenting themself as a fabricator, even as novice, should be versed in proper fabrication methods. If you took any money for providing the work, you could be held criminally if you aren't licensed. A buddy can still be the 'plaintiff', and you could be the 'defendant'.






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