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hi, i am a noob in woodworking and i just bought the kreg pocket hole jig yesterday and its very helpfull.

i wanted to know if there is many other little tools like that who can make the job easier (like a shelf pin drill kit and things like that).
 

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Sawdust Creator
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I think the best advice for those without an unlimited budget, is to buy what you need for the project at hand.
 

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My $.02, your brain is the best tool. But to put stuff into your hands?

A metal carpenters square. 3 of them. 6", 12", 24".

A GOOD shop pencil.

A GREAT tape measure. After all, it's what you're relying on to make everything right!

And good consumables: blades, sandpaper, bits, discs, etc. don't skimp out on the things that you need the most.

-Rob
 

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I am still learning and building up my aresenal of tools. I think the most important of tools is a table saw, miter saw, jig saw, cordless & corded drill. Then you move up to getting accessory tools, biscuit cutter, planer, sanders, circular, belt sanders, drill press, band saw, and lots and lots of clamps. 3/4" pipe clamps work the best. And someday a jointer so you can glue up boards and have a true flat edge on each board.
 

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crosseyed & dyslexic
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Making the job easier? That comes with time spent learning the simple things like joinery and their applications. In my humble opinion a pocket hole jig doesn't do much for that.
Knowing how to tune your table saw or band saw make things easier, learning how to get a square edge or making a perfect miter makes thing easier.
Buy what you need as you need it, Rockler, Lee Valley make some pretty catalogs with all kinds of things that you just can't live without like that shelf pin jig right? Spend some more time in the shop and you'll soon learn that jig making is an art in itself.
And pretty soon you'll be making those jigs and wondering why would anyone waste their money on that store bought crap.
My advice would be, don't be in a hellfire hurry to make things easier.
No offense meant.
 

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In my opinion, the best way to determine what you'll need is to have a project to work on. At that point you'll start to see what tools you'll need to do the job and/or make it easier to build.

Later on, you use this technique to your advantage to get new tools by coming up with a project for your wife that "requires" a certain tool to do it properly. :yes:
 

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Really underground garage
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He's in the shop using his Kreg.

To OP,make yourself a flat torsion box,assembly table.Then work out the design so your kreg clamps can do field work on your new table.Then get a nice medium priced chop saw.Start selling stuff because it's a looooong dark rd($$) trying to equip a shop.
 

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sonny23 said:
hi, i am a noob in woodworking and i just bought the kreg pocket hole jig yesterday and its very helpfull.

i wanted to know if there is many other little tools like that who can make the job easier (like a shelf pin drill kit and things like that).
I'm still getting my shop put together and stocked up. There is so much stuff out there that I know I'll need and or really want. What I've been doing is picking a project getting the stuff I need to make it and make a few then design my own piece. Once I get ready to move on to making something new I'll get the tools or materials I need for that and do it all over again. I try to pick projects that I have most of what I need already and buy one or two things as needed. This process won't throw you into bankruptcy, will keep you building and before you know it you'll look around your shop and think man I've got a lot of stuff. Just my 2 cents and kind of how I approach things
 

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To be honest its about the art of building. The process and time you put into it. That and knowing what the tool does. I started out with the rule of hand tools only. ( except a drill and skill saw) learn how to do it without a power tool and you will learn what needs to happen. And typically hand tools are cheaper. Even with my bandsaw , drill press, and radial arm saw I still do things by hand
 

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Power tool edges arrive sharp. No immediate need to learn all that you need to know for sharpening.
I needed to build simple benches, furnitire and fences. Immediately.
Holes and screws: 3/8" variable speed reversing drill. Then came a 10" Delta miter saw and shortly thereafter, a router (which I still use very little.) Next were a tabletop Ryobi bandsaw, a tabletop Delta 8" drill press and a 10" Ryobi table saw ($100 for each of those). Delta scroll saw got in there, too, some time ago.

The island bench in my shop has the miter saw, drill press, scroll saw and band saw mounted around the 4 sides. THAT bench is a useful shop tool
I have chainsaws and a Skilsaw and other stuff. I get by with very little help from my friends. Not fine-furniture grade power tools by any stretch of the noggin.
 

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I'll vote for a good router, then a router table. Of course you'll need router bits. With a little thinking a router table can be used as an edge joiner, box joint jig, dado and rabbet cutter, flute cutter, slot cutter, chamfer/flush trim/pattern/profile/miter/etc.. Add a dovetail jig later (one that comes with the required bits), and you'll only have scratched the potential uses for a router/router table combo.

Of course a table saw to cut big boards down to the size you'll need is handy. A band saw for the curved edges, and a drum sander to smooth them out. ....
 

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I did forget about the sharpening. Its second nature to me now. And then it was too. to me its the third on the list of good things to know. First being how not to be in the dog house and the second being how to get out of the dog house.
 

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I think the best advice for those without an unlimited budget, is to buy what you need for the project at hand.
That is a great idea, but I'm one of those people that see's and then wants it!:wallbash: That is not good. :sad: There are a lot of people saying "buy the tools as needed", I'm going to have to listen to them. I support there comments.
 

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Some small tools to make things easier:
Combination squares 6" & 12"
8" tri square
4" machinist square for setting up saws
Dial caliper for checking wood thickness when planning
18" hook ruler
36" 48" straight edges
 
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