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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would like to clear coat some garden tools I had to rescue from being outdoors for years. All clear wood now, I would like something oil-based and will keep them indoors when not in use.

The last time I did this I used a combination of an oil and a solvent, AFAICR, and it worked great, but can't now find my notes.

Thanks.

Don.
 

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I would like to clear coat some garden tools I had to rescue from being outdoors for years. All clear wood now, I would like something oil-based and will keep them indoors when not in use.

The last time I did this I used a combination of an oil and a solvent, AFAICR, and it worked great, but can't now find my notes.

Thanks.

Don.
To keep it simple I'd probably apply a liberal application of Boiled Linseed Oil a couple of times or more a week or two apart. A paper towel applicator and burned when finished takes care of any fire hazards with a drying oil.
 

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If you are good to keep them indoors when not in use I would use an gloss oil based polyurethane. I have the tendency to leave them outdoors so I use a gloss spar varnish. A gloss sheen is better to retard water in any finish.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Ah, thanks, you have reminded me: seems to me I used 50-50 boiled linseed oil & turpentine. At any rate I'm about 90% it involved boiled linseed oil.

Does that sound about right?

Don.
 

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If you prefer to oil the wood I would recommend using tung oil. It is waterproof where linseed oil isn't. Just use 100% tung oil. Some tung oil finishes are more varnish than tung oil.
 

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We thin epoxy and wipe it on.
 

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Tung oil would apply the same as linseed oil. The big difference is the drying time between coats. It might take anywhere from a week to a month for a coat of real tung oil to dry enough for another coat. The way to tell when it's ready is to briskly rub the finish with a clean dry cloth and smell to see if the tung oil odor is on the rag. When there is no odor then it's dry. It's a pain but is a durable finish. It was originally used as a finish for the hull of boats.
 
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