Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
stop labeling people
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Searching for anyone interested in turning a few of these. Note that there are two styles, one with clipped ends, the other is full-round.
Willing to cover shipping both ways and pay for services. Please feel free to contact me here first, then we will move to private discussion for contact info and invoicing.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
299 Posts
Should be straightforward enough.
They're oak are they not?
Do you intend to provide the rough stock, or would that be the turner's responsibility? Looks like they'd come out of 12/4 stock easily enough, but photos can be deceiving sometimes.

You'd provide an accurate pattern, or a real sample to copy, I'm assuming?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,339 Posts
Those pieces could be made with scrap wood, just laminate it together. It's the reason the originals came off. Originally the leg was laminated with several layers of thinner stock to make the necessary thickness.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
299 Posts
Those pieces could be made with scrap wood, just laminate it together. It's the reason the originals came off. Originally the leg was laminated with several layers of thinner stock to make the necessary thickness.
So first of all you say that the originals broke because they were not laminated, then in the next sentence you say "originally" they were indeed "laminated with several layers of thinner stock"

That's difficult to understand.

I don't have enough information to be definitive, but if the projects that the OP is undertaking are true restoration work, substituting laminated pieces for components that were not originally laminated would not be acceptable, even if it would produce a more durable result.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,339 Posts
So first of all you say that the originals broke because they were not laminated, then in the next sentence you say "originally" they were indeed "laminated with several layers of thinner stock"

That's difficult to understand.

I don't have enough information to be definitive, but if the projects that the OP is undertaking are true restoration work, substituting laminated pieces for components that were not originally laminated would not be acceptable, even if it would produce a more durable result.
What I mean is when the company was making the furniture they just laminated the wood they had into turning squares and then turned the legs from them. It's very common for table legs to be laminated from thinner material. Because of the age of the furniture and perhaps the way it was stored the glue deteriorated and just let go. It not a separate piece that was added to the leg, at one time the leg was considered one piece of wood. It's possible the wood was laminated 100 years ago. That is a long time to ask glue to hold wood together.

This table leg is 3 1/2" in diameter and is four pieces of wood laminated together. It is still together and I happen to know it was a used piece of furniture that was given as a wedding gift in 1900.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
299 Posts
Oh ok, Steve, thanks for the clarification.
I've certainly seen plenty of laminated work in old furniture, and even more in old boats, but I've also seen plenty of turned elements in both furniture and architecture which were from solid stock, especially in oak and even more especially in historic church work.

It's entirely possible that the original piece split off at a historic glue joint (hide glue, I'd bet, if that's the case) but I can't tell for sure from the photo. I've also seen oak (and mahogany) split off like that by reason of poorly thought-out grain orientation in the original work.

Not all old cabinetwork and furniture making was good quality, even as it's often today held in high esteem. That table leg in your photo can serve as a case in point, as an example of clumsy and visually discordant grain alignment.

Anyway, it's the OP's call, and to be honest, laminating the stock would add labor and increase the price per piece without a doubt, even taking into account that 4/4 is cheaper by the bf than 12/4.
 

·
stop labeling people
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Confirming the piece we are working on is crafted from solid stock, not laminates. The legs are solid, save for the glue-on profile at the leg base. We have no desire to have laminated stock turned as replacements.
We are looking for three replacement pieces per style, 6 pieces in all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,339 Posts
You may be in for a surprise. A turning once turned and finished is very difficult to tell if and where it's laminated. The table of mine only one of the legs you can tell has been laminated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
299 Posts
Confirming the piece we are working on is crafted from solid stock, not laminates. The legs are solid, save for the glue-on profile at the leg base. We have no desire to have laminated stock turned as replacements.
We are looking for three replacement pieces per style, 6 pieces in all.
OK, that's as I suspected.

I have more than enough well-seasoned 12/4 oak for a quantity like that. By-well seasoned I mean air-dried and stored indoors for more than 8 years now.

I'm on the run right now, but I'll PM you when I get time, probably tomorrow evening, with contact details and we can proceed from there.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top