Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm new to this forum so Hi to everyone! I'm looking to purchase a new belt sander which will be used to sand chunky table tops etc. I am torn between the Makita 9403 & the 9404.
I know the 9403 is more powerful, and heavier, and single speed, and I know the 9404 has auto tracking and variable speed but that's about it.
Can anyone help me with my dilemma?
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
29,992 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you, I've had a look at them but still not sure which will be better for me. Amazon and other reviews tend to be posted quite soon after purchase so my assumption was that the purchaser may not have given the tool much use (if that makes sense), I was looking for user reviews from people that have had either of these machines for a while and know them well so can give me a more realistic point of view.
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,017 Posts



We have an introduction section where you can say a few words about yourself. If you fill out your profile in your "User Control Panel", you can list any hobbies, experience or other facts. You can also list your general geographical location which would be a help in answering some questions.

If you haven't used a belt sander, there is a learning curve. Hand held belt sanders are heavy tools, and for the most part are a two handed tool. Using one takes some experience as it's similar to using a circular (rotating) floor buffer, in that there is a sweet spot on the pad that allows good control. With a floor buffer, that sweet spot will allow you to control that machine with one hand. Off that spot, the machine will carry you to the closest wall. Once you get familiar with the "feel" of the belt sander, control is more of just guiding the tool, and letting its weight work for you.

It has some grab due to the belt abrading, which accounts for a "pull" from the tool, that requires some resistance to control it. Using one for a whole day could make your wrist, arms, and some back muscles a bit sore.

They are very aggressive, and can do a lot of damage pretty quick. Care has to be taken as a common problem are dents or dimples in the surface from the rollers. You may not see them until you quit sanding.

While Makita makes some good tools, I've had a few of their belt sanders and wouldn't buy another. I would recommend a PC 360 VS. It's a bit more pricey, but IMO, one well made industrial quality tool. That's my story and I'm stickin' to it.










.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Cabinetman, unfortunately here in the UK we can't buy PC tools, so I thought the Makita would be a decent alternative. I am a hobbyist making lots of different items from reclaimed materials. A lot of my items have the odd nail hole, dent etc which gives them a rustic character. I haven't used a belt sander before so thanks for your advice. I have a variety of sanders, for fast initial sanding I usually use a dewalt angle grinder fitted with a Bosch sanding pad, but the dust is a nightmare. For other sanding I have a Festool Rotex 125 and a Bosch gss280 orbital which are great for finishing.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top