Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am working on a router table all I have left to do is put the opening in for the plate ect. I have been shopping and am a little confused on what to get or what is important when selecting a router? How helpful is a lift ect.? I can see there is a lot of experience out here so any tips would be greatly appreciated.:smile:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
419 Posts
A lift

is a nice plus but by no means a necessity. The three most important features are, in this order:
1] A top that is solid and does not flex under a load.
2] A reliable fence that will hold it's location but can be adjusted easily.
3] A router with suffucient horsepower to spin the tools you might use.

A lift can be added at any point you choose in the future.

Ed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
714 Posts
How much horsepower would you recommend? Any brands that are very good but not overpriced?

Here again, it's about like buying a car...

I like my Hitachi 2 1/4 HP Combo (fixed & plunge base)... got it on sale at Rocklers... arnd $140.

I use it in a table most of the time... the router easily comes out of it (fixed base, in table) and easily slides into the plunge base.

I have used it both ways... but it lives in the table.

I don't feel like I need the 3+ HP routers because I don't see myself using those BIG bit sets for raised panel doors, etc.

To me, the 2 1/4 HP is just a good all around power level for general use.

But, that's me...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
I am new to routers and purchased a dewalt with a 3+ hp motor. Below is a photo of a set up I just recently worked with:



As you can see, the raised panel bit is too large for the opening. I had to leave a small thread of wood under the bit in order to make the cuts. I tackled this by running the panel through the plainer one last time to remove the scrap wood.

With this set up, I am finding it hard to remove bits and to get a precise bit height set because it is difficult to raise and lower the router once the bit is tightened. There are routers out there that are advertised to have micro adjustments that are easily done from above the table. I will be looking for one of these when it comes time for replacement.

As far as hp, I'm thinking get the largest amount you can afford.

Warning....if you are new (as I am), this is a really dangerous tool if used wrong....I read a lot of safety precautions and attempted to follow but my concentration wandered on one cut and the router let me know that that was a mistake. Be careful.

Anyone out there with router safety suggestions? I would be interested in hearing them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
714 Posts
Never heard anything about these routers. But it sounds like alot of router for the money. Maybe to good to be true so maybe some one else can chime in if they own/used one of these.

http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyid=20403&refcode=75IN10RL
Yes, that is alot of router for the money...

BUT...

Chances are you will be using the router from a Table (fixed base) more than in Plunge mode (displayed plunge base).

Don't know if this router can be used with a Fixed Base... if not, = bummer.

There are not any Guide bushings... = bummer.

This appears to be a router dedicated to plunge mode only... which is for a more dedicated type use than overall general use.

I would highly reccomend a "Combo" kit type setup... where a Fixed base can be mounted in a router table and the router motor section can easily be moved from the fixed base to the Plunge base.
Most Combo kits also include a set of Guide bushings and other goodies that you would not have to pay extra for.

Really, for Routers, there is a forum that Specializes in routers... it would really better to also get help there (and tell them you came from here!!).
http://www.routerforums.com ... there is more to learn about routers... I think we specialize more in general woodworking here and they specialize in routers. If I'm out of line, please tell me...

It's like telling a Gimbal's customer to go to Macy's to get something... in one of those Christmas Santa Claus classic movies.

Right off, I think I can safely say, if you want a 3+ HP router, you should be looking for a Combo as mentioned... My Hitachi kit a combo... Craftsman, surprisingly, has a nice looking Combo... etc.
 

·
Woodworker and Contractor
Joined
·
97 Posts
At $220 it's a littlle pricy but it comes with fixed and plunge bases and is a proven work horse that will last a long long time. It has both 1/2 " and 1/4" collets, good design and a easy to find. This is what I use and have spun very large bits with it even at 1 3/4 hp.

Description
694VK Two routers, one motor, in one kit. Kit includes #690 1 3/4 HP, 11 Amps, variable speed (10,000-27,500 RPM) router, 1/4" & 1/2" collets and standard base along with plunge base, wrenches and case.

http://www.grizzly.com/products/H5220
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
At the same price ($220), I picked up the Bosch version of the PC kit at Lowes. http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId=136633-353-1617EVSPK&lpage=none
I checked them both out and thought the Bosch's plunge worked a little better. I bit more horsepower too. I don't have much experience with it or routers in general but so far I think it's a very good tool. It has the added benefit of being available from Lowes so if you don't like it, it's easy to return.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
Never heard anything about these routers. But it sounds like alot of router for the money. Maybe to good to be true so maybe some one else can chime in if they own/used one of these.

http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyid=20403&refcode=75IN10RL
I was actually at Woodcraft on friday asking about this router. The woman there wasn't much help because it isn't a normal stocked item and they'll only have them until they're gone.
I need another router for a table but that one isn't it. Freud does have a 2 base router but it's not the 3 1/4 hp one.

Keep your eyes pealed if you want a Freud. Last year around christmas if you bought the interchangable one but with the fixed base you could get a plunge base for free.
 

·
flatiron
Joined
·
71 Posts
old school.

I would by a delta or a dewalt, like a chevrolet been around forever. half inch collet a must, less flex of the bit. More acessories available that will fit them both delta or dewalt and after market. Thats my thoughts on this subject but heck I not perfect! Just opinionated....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
803 Posts
1/4 & 1/2" collets for sure. I lost the 1/2" one for my Bosch in a move and nearly LOST it!!!!:furious:







...found it in a box of stuffed toys 6 months later. Go figure.:wallbash:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
I, personally, purchase a Porter-Cable. Other than the fact that I have had good luck with their tools that I have purchased already, I did notice one thing: Almost ALL of Router accessories are able to be used on a Porter-Cable router, or are set up that way by default.
So, if I needed to purchase another guide bushing set, I would know that there would be one out there for it. Same thing with edge guides and after-market add-ons.
Just a thought.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
I own 11 routers, and have 13 more at the school where I teach. Most are Porter-Cable, one Bosch, one Ryobi (before they got to be cheap junk) and a Stanley (older than I am). I would say that you want a router that is easy to adjust, one that is not terribly heavy, one that will powerful enough to spin the bits you intend to use, and one that doesn't cost you an arm and a leg.

If you are going to use it in a router table most of the time, I really like my PC 7518. It's a fixed base router (easy adjustments), 1/2" collet (1/4" and 3/8" are readily available). And 5 speeds (10K, 13K, 16K 19K, and 22k rpm)for a variety of different diameters of router bits. The place where this router lacks is in the weight, it's rather weighty at about 14 lbs and in price, about $300. But used strictly for the router table it's an excellent choice. The weight actually helps to stabilize the table. If you prefer a plunge base router instead, the same motor can be had in the 7539 configuration.

If $300+ is too much to bite off at first, then I would consider the PC 890 series, it has a wide variety of base choices (fixed/plunge/D-handle), collets (comes with 1/4 and 1/2), power I believe it is a 12 amp motor (2 1/4 hp) with soft start, and variable speed. The model 892 (fixed base version) sells for around $200.

The 690 series is also a pretty good starting point (I own 4 690s). Some of the new ones are variable speed (none of mine are, wish one of them was).

Bosch and Dewalt are both good tools as well. Recently Dewalts' owners bought Porter Cable and Delta, so we will have to see what changes to the tool lines occur, but I am guessing some models of both lines will get the axe.

Sorry to be so long, but this is a pretty important decision and I would like for you to be as well informed as possible.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top