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I just bought a pound from eBay from the seller 35beeman. He was very responsive and I received it in a couple days after paying. It was under $15 for a pound including shipping. I haven't used it yet, but it looks great.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well, I might be getting about 100 lbs of it for a very good price.

Might a lot to spare. Turns out a friend of mine back in NYC was making soap a long time ago, got out of it nd has this quantity available - she didn't want to throw it away. So...... I'm waiting for her to get back to me with a price.
 

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You can use a mineral oil / wax combination that will impart some luster and give some water resistance. You can also buff the wax to give it a little shine. However, you should saturate the board with oil before adding the wax since the wax won't penetrate completely through the board.
 

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I want a nice finish on my boards. the mineral oil seems to be really dull looking. I was thinking the wax would help with that.
The wax will have more of a shine initially, but this will may last long, as in days rather than weeks.

The wax does not penetrate as deep as the mineral oil.

You can always try mixing the two. One of the Woodcraft products is George's Clubhouse Wax, which is combination of mineral oil and beeswax. Mostly wax.

I tried the George's product and another one called Butcher Block Conditioner, which is more liquid. Neither seemed to last long.

I switched back to just mineral oil.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
interesting.

i need the sheen as i am selling these and they have to photograph well.

currently, i'm using watco butcher block oil which is durable but is toxic till it cures.

even this oil dulls down fairly quickly. just need it to be bright and popping looking for sales and i'd like a finish which starts out as non-toxic.
 

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You may be looking for more than a non-drying oil or finish can deliver. In general. Oils will sometimes look glossy but the gloss will quickly become just a warm glow as the oil is absorbed into the wood. Waxes like beeswax and paraffin will not produce a gloss finish.

I'm not real sure I understand what you are doing but the best solution may be to use a film-forming finish like shellac or lacquer. These dry fast and produce a gloss finish and durable finish.
 

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I have sold about two dozen cutting boards, all were finished with just mineral oil. No one said anything about them not being shiny.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
You may be looking for more than a non-drying oil or finish can deliver. In general. Oils will sometimes look glossy but the gloss will quickly become just a warm glow as the oil is absorbed into the wood. Waxes like beeswax and paraffin will not produce a gloss finish.

I'm not real sure I understand what you are doing but the best solution may be to use a film-forming finish like shellac or lacquer. These dry fast and produce a gloss finish and durable finish.
a warm glow is totally fine with me. I need the woods in the board to pop and be high contrast.

with mineral oil (foodsafe), the boards always look dull and dry to me. and thats ok if somebody is custom ordering them. they'll understand. but, if you look at listings on etsy, these boards pop. mine need to as well.

a film finish isn't a good idea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
here is what I'm taking about... one board is duller than the other and it shows up in the photo.

this is what people expect to see. once they're in use, what ever - doesn't really matter.

they need to look as full and rich, grain popping as much as possible to catch peoples eye.
 

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I see two issues here. One is that you want to take a picture is a shiny board, the other is that you want a high quality picture.

The first of these is easy, just oil your board right before the photo. The second issue can be much more difficult as you need to control lighting, exposure, and white balance to pull off a snappy photo. Here is a photo I took of my recent cutting boards. I used a simple white poster board for the backdrop and one external flash unit on my DSLR to blow out the background and light the boards.



image-2781580559.jpg

These boards had been oiled a few days before and weren't particularly shiny, but the lighting and exposure makes them look very high quality.
 
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