Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone, I have been very fortunate to be given an old lathe and wood turning tools. Unfortunately I know nothing about wood turning, but would dearly love to give it a go. However, I’m not familiar with the “face plate” on the lathe, and as I cannot find a makers mark, I really don’t know what I’m looking at. Any advice on what I’ve been given, what face plates / chucks I require etc, I would be very grateful. I know very little and would love to learn as much as possible. Thank you in advance for your help. Debbie.
Plant Wood Gas Machine Metal


Gas Circle Composite material Auto part Machine
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,029 Posts
Others more knowledgeable than me since I have a lathe I’ve used exactly twice 😳.

For turning spindles a a spur is used.

That’s an unusual looking face plate. Do you know what they were doing with it?

I would first determine it has a Morse taper and get a spur to start practicing.

You also need to get familiar with sharpening.

There are some good introductory videos out there, I remember one the guy deliberately did a bunch of catches to show how they happen and it helped me not be so afraid of them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Others more knowledgeable than me since I have a lathe I’ve used exactly twice 😳.

For turning spindles a a spur is used.

That’s an unusual looking face plate. Do you know what they were doing with it?

I would first determine it has a Morse taper and get a spur to start practicing.

You also need to get familiar with sharpening.

There are some good introductory videos out there, I remember one the guy deliberately did a bunch of catches to show how they happen and it helped me not be so afraid of them.
thank you Robert. I’ll look up Morse taper and spur, and good idea on watching videos for help. I have no idea what the lathe was used for unfortunately, and it is indeed a strange faceplate!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,259 Posts
It would appear that the face plate also serves as the "spur drive".
Wood Gas Font Composite material Circle


My guess is the the spur points can be removed (most likely accomplished from the backside of the plate) when one wishes to use the plate as a "face plate".
From this photo alone, it is hard to guess how the faceplate shown is attached to the spindle.
Have you looked on the bottom side of the lathe for any info? Is the an end cover to the motor housing, which can be removed for inspection and possibly more info behind it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It would appear that the face plate also serves as the "spur drive".
View attachment 441409

My guess is the the spur points can be removed (most likely accomplished from the backside of the plate) when one wishes to use the plate as a "face plate".
From this photo alone, it is hard to guess how the faceplate shown is attached to the spindle.
Have you looked on the bottom side of the lathe for any info? Is the an end cover to the motor housing, which can be removed for inspection and possibly more info behind it?
It would appear that the face plate also serves as the "spur drive".
View attachment 441409

My guess is the the spur points can be removed (most likely accomplished from the backside of the plate) when one wishes to use the plate as a "face plate".
From this photo alone, it is hard to guess how the faceplate shown is attached to the spindle.
Have you looked on the bottom side of the lathe for any info? Is the an end cover to the motor housing, which can be removed for inspection and possibly more info behind it?
Hello Dave. Thank you for your reply. I’m not sure the purpose of Drive Spurs, but yes they screw out of the round plate (From the front). The round plate is rotated around the centering spur, and this is how it’s attached to the machine. I’ve removed the end cover, and there’s two wheels with a drive belt. No makers marks at all anywhere, but if it’s of significance, the machine was given to me by a French neighbour.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,929 Posts
from experience, i will say that lathe will give you nothing but frustration and lead you to give up on doing any work on a lathe again. not trying to be a downer, but that looks like an old cheap lathe, aka the type of lathe that hurts the hobby

i inherited my (much better quality) lathe in 1982 and am just now giving up using it out of frustration. i've made quite a few bowls on it, but it takes a few tries for everything. i've bought chucks, live centers, carbide cutters and finally put a dc drive on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hello Dave. Thank you for your reply. I’m not sure the purpose of Drive Spurs, but yes they screw out of the round plate (From the front). The round plate is rotated around the centering spur, and this is how it’s attached to the machine. I’ve removed the end cover, and there’s two wheels with a drive belt. No makers marks at all anywhere, but if it’s of significance, the machine was given to me by a French neighbour.
Plant Wood Automotive lighting Gas Audio equipment




Motor vehicle Plant Automotive tire Wood Vehicle

You might try going to the owwm.org site (old woodworking machines). You might find someone there that is more familiar with it.
Please let us know what you find out.
Thank you for the information. I’ll have a look online. Debbie
from experience, i will say that lathe will give you nothing but frustration and lead you to give up on doing any work on a lathe again. not trying to be a downer, but that looks like an old cheap lathe, aka the type of lathe that hurts the hobby

i inherited my (much better quality) lathe in 1982 and am just now giving up using it out of frustration. i've made quite a few bowls on it, but it takes a few tries for everything. i've bought chucks, live centers, carbide cutters and finally put a dc drive on it.
Thank you for your honesty.
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
31,954 Posts
Lathe work typically falls into two categories:
Spindles, long slender shapes like hand rail spindles or chair spindles, turned between the centers on the headstock and the tail stock
They are tricky to master because they are so delicate, the tools must be very sharp and held at the correct angle and supported on the long horizontal tool rest.

Bowls, are larger diameter dished out shapes held on a face plate, typically by a block glued to the final piece which is screwed on from the rear of the faceplate. The sacrificial block is then separated off the final piece when it's finished
The tool rest is often placed across the front of the block at an angle to support the gouges needed to hollow out the inside shape.
Starting out with a rectangular shape is not good and it will be out of balance. It's always best to make as round of a starting block as possible.
The balance will will improve as the shape gets more cylindrical

A lathe can only make cylindrical shapes. Laminations of different colored wood can make incredibly beautiful shapes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Lathe work typically falls into two categories:
Spindles, long slender shapes like hand rail spindles or chair spindles, turned betwwween the centers on the headstock and the tail stock
They are tricky to master because they are so delicate, the tools must be very sharp and held at the correct angle and supported on the long horizontal tool rest.

Bowls, are larger diameter dished out shapes held on a face plate, typically by a block glued to the final piece which is screwed on from the rear of the faceplate. The sacrificial block is then separated off the final piece when it's finished
The tool rest is often placed across the front of the block at an angle to support the gouges need to hollow out the inside shape.
Starting out with a rectangular shape is not good and it will be out of balance. It's always best to make as round of a starting block as possible.
The balance will will improve as the shape gets more cylindrical

A lathe can only make cylindrical shapes. Laminations of different colored wood can make incredibly beautiful shapes.
Thank you so much for explaining lathe work clearly and simply to me. When you don’t know the subject, it’s an absolute minefield.
 

·
Premium Member
A cat made me do it.
Joined
·
1,426 Posts
No makers marks at all anywhere, but if it’s of significance, the machine was given to me by a French neighbour.
You might try going to the owwm.org site (old woodworking machines).
Likely it was made in Europe, see if you can find an European site like owwm. I don't have any lathe experience, just looking at it as a machine I'll guess it was made in the 1950s or '60s.
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
31,954 Posts
here's a video show how a large log is turned on the lathe and what tools are used in the process.
There are some very specialized tools used here, one's I've never seen before, Quite clever!
Stitches means those little walnut blocks glued across the cracks to help prevent them from opening any further.
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top