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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm just turning small objects right now but I would like to get into larger pieces in the future.
I would like to purchase the Beall buffing system but don't know if I should buy the system that fits on the lathe or get the system where you can put individual buffing wheels on a grinder. Could I have some of your opinions please?
I would also like to know what speed grinder I should use with this buffing system. Lastly, I would like to know if I have to purchase a special shaft or adaptor to have the buffing wheel in a safe and appropriate distance from the grinder motor.

Thank you
Dick
 

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I made my buffing system myself and even after buying the Beal brand compounds, I still have less than half the cost of buying the Beal system.:thumbsup:

I made mine to fit on my lathe. Im also considering making an individual wheel system and just using a motor from an old furnace.
 

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G'day Dick,

I usually use hard & soft wax as a finish but I have found the Beale system very restricting when it comes to any deep bowl etc.
The Beale system id great for the outside of bowl & platters etc.
For the inside of deep bowls etc I now use a lambs wool buffing pad fitted to my electric drill. If the item is deeper then I just fit it to an extension rod.
Looking at buying an 8' or 12' extension so I can use the buffing pads on my lathe.
HTH

Col
 

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I bought the 8" Don Pencil extension for the Beal. Then I use the 3" wheels instead of 8". I run my lathe at moderate speed, about 1500 rpm or so and with the 3" wheels that's a much slower speed than Beale recommends. The 8" extension lets me reach into bowls and can buff platters and such with ease.
 

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With three wheels together on the lathe it gets crowded for bigger bowls. If you have a long bed you could replace the stock Beall rod with a longer one and space them more. The ball buffs are more versatile and as has been mentioned you can get extensions for deeper bowls. Don Pencil is a good source and he has some other cool things on his site.
Another idea is to put the first two wheels on the lathe and then just use the wax one on the grinder. That gives you more room all around.
I have both the disc/ wheel and the ball shaped buff and find the ball more versatile
 

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I purchased the Beall components

http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Mer...de=packard&Product_Code=123901&Category_Code=

I mounted the Tripoli and White Diamond wheels on a piece of threaded rod which I install in the lathe to use. The length is the max I can use with the tailstock all the way at the end of the bed, about 21in between the scroll chuck and the tailstock.

I am not using the wax wheel.

I normally use the Tripoli wheel. I use this after turning to find any tool marks still present before I apply finish.

I also use it to buff the coat of finish prior to the next coat.

I then use it to buff the final coat, and finally the White Diamond wheel.
 

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I have the eight inch wheels on a jet 1 1/2 hp buffer spinning at 3450 rims. The Beale system comes with an assortment of shaft extensions, spacers, etc., so the wheels are spaced out from the motor. I have one wheel for the wax on the left, other two are spaced apart from each other on the right. When I do a big bowl, I'll take one wheel off the inside on the right. This puts the other wheel all the way at the end of the shaft. It makes it easy to get down inside the bowl. I haven't found too much I can't buff with this setup.
Mike Hawkins;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm getting alot of good replies and great ideas.

Dave Paine, could I ask you, why don't you use the wax wheel?

Thank you
Dick
 
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