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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi guys. Am new to the forum but have some experience working with wood. Dad and granddad were both full range carpenters in PA but I went to college and am nearing the end of a 30 year career with the UN. Am now in Amman, Jordan for the next few years and renting a nice rooftop flat that needs improvements and more shelving and storage. I'm trying (so far unsuccessfully) to attach drawings of plans for a bathroom unit I'll be making and appreciate any advice so I don't omit anything or do something stupid. Will be gluing and screwing it together. Having a local chap cut the pieces to size and I'll take it from there. Don't need a museum piece, just something functional that looks ok for the few years I'll need it. It'll stay behind for the next tenant. My main concern is that the pieces are the right sizes for what I want. A toilet and a bidet are under the long side and a clothes hamper under the "L". Thanks for any advice. Cheers and best regards, Ric from Amman.
 

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Well if you've been reading the forum you'll know there is a raging debate over Pocket hole jigs and their usefulness. It sounds like pocket holes might be right up your alley to assemble this thing. Easy to use and cheap (get a cheap jig from woodworkers supply not the 250$ kreg jig). I'm sure you can get it done with screws a little glue and a counter sink bit too. Figure out how to get the plans attached and we can give you more specifics.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Jack. I'll have to read up on pocket hole jigs. But most likely I'll go the drilled holes, glue and countersink screws route. Gonna attempt again to attach the plans. Cheers, Ric.
 

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for the selves just run narrow strip underneath and create an L type situation for the shelf to sit on. Then the strip of wood takes the weight instead of the actual screws. Hard to go wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Bathroom shelves

Yes I thought to put strips on the sides to support the shelves. What about quarter-round? I also got someone to reduce the size of my drawings and am now attaching them. Any other advice much appreciated. Cheers, Ric.
 

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Cutting through the long gain

as you are doing when you cut in those notches is a tricky thing. Each one of those individual segments you have created are now prone to breaking off from the full length. Shallow dado cuts may be preferable in your situation, or biscuits, dowels blind splines etc.
Sliding dovetails is another excellent joint for your application and relatively easy to make with a router and straight edge.

Ed
 

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Ed is definately correct on the notching (half lap type joint). I agree with all of Eds suggestions. However, I think glue, screws, and a supporting strip underneath is all that is really necessary. And yeah 1/4 round would work fine. Nail it with glue and counter sink the nails.

What material are we using by the way??? I've been assuming something like pine.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Bathroom shelving

Hi guys. Using 15mm mdf white mel. Decent solid wood not easily available here. Had all the pieces cut in a local cabinet shop and they did a great job, down to the mm. Will be extremely careful with the half lap type joint. Dry fit is perfect. Couldn't get 1/4 round so using a diagonally cut 1" x 1" piece of mystery wood the guy threw in along with a bag of 1.5" mdf screws. Will post pics of the finished product. Thanks for the advice. Am now encouraged to keep on with additional projects. Cheers, Ric from Amman.
 

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with MDF you don't need to worry about it spliting on the grain at least. What will happen is those corners will warp down unless you have the support strips but it sounds like you have that handled. One thing I would add since this is a wet environment is caulk the seams especially where the thing touched the floor. If you get water in one of those cut joints it will swell and look really ugly. Water based paint will also raise the "grain" so if you can get your hands on a sanding sealer it would pay to get sealer on before you paint it.

Good Luck
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Bathroom shelving

Well I'm ready to assemble this and will certainly cover any exposed mdf edges with something not water based to seal them. I kinda like the look of the brown edges, ever so slightly beveled, with the white melamine and wonder if I could use say polyurethane on the edges. This would seal them and perhaps even darken them a bit. Except for the top shelf, the other shelves will simply be loose and lay on the supports which are glued and screwed to the ends of the unit. Gonna screw the thing together with no glue so I can dis-assemble it if need be. Putting plastic feet with rubber grommets on the bottom so it'll be about a full centimeter off the floor. Over here in Jordan it's so darn dry that even if water spashes on the floor it's dry in a few minutes. Virtually no humidity in the air, not even in the bathroom during a shower. Will post pics of the finished unit. Thanks for all your advice. Cheers and best regards, Ric.
 
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