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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a chance to do some electrical work at a company that majors in wood shop tools. Electrical work is my occupation. It probably would only be about 2 hrs of labor. For my labor I can get tools. I already have,
Portable Table Saw
12" Sliding Compound Miter Saw
Router and portable table
Multiple styles of Sanders
and some basic hand tools
I was wondering, what are some of the basic tools that you have needed but didn't have at the time you needed them? I was thinking about trying to get a portable power hand plainer out of them, any other suggestions out there. Thanks
 

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I have a chance to do some electrical work at a company that majors in wood shop tools. Electrical work is my occupation. It probably would only be about 2 hrs of labor. For my labor I can get tools. I already have,
Portable Table Saw
12" Sliding Compound Miter Saw
Router
and some basic hand tools
I was wondering, what are some of the basic tools that you have needed but didn't have at the time you needed them? I was thinking about trying to get a portable power hand plainer out of them, any other suggestions out there. Thanks
How about telling us what this company makes or sells.

I have a portable power planer. Perhaps the least used power tool I own. Good for fixing a sticking door, or for taking off bumps on studs/framing.

The challenge is that it is very difficult to control the tool. Slight inconsistencies in feed rate, which is user controlled, will alter how much wood is removed. Being slower removes more wood, being faster removes less.

If you want to hand plane wood - get a hand plane. It will produce much better results than the power hand planer.
 

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Since you already have a router how about a decent table for it or other accessories.
Good router bits are nice to have.
Take any leftover change in clamps.. ya can't have to many clamps!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Dave Paine said:
How about telling us what this company makes or sells.

.

The company is Sacramento Machinery Company, linked to , The CB Tool Group, www.cbtoolgroup.com.

I also already have a portable router table for my router. Thank for the info about the portable planers, I have always wondered about those.
 

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I took a look at their web site and noticed jig saws - specifically the Bosch. I own one and use it fairly often. That Bosh is one good jig saw and I'm glad I own one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What about router bits? I have a 24 piece set from Harbor Freight and I know what that is! So if I could please ask for people input on what brand I should get? I'll be playing with hard and soft wood so I guess that 1/4" shank would be fine. Thanks for your input once again.
 

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Depends on the type of stuff you make. I have most tools but no room in my small workshop to cut 4' x8' sheets so a circular saw and saw horses are a must for me. Ther people have more use for a jigsaw etc.
 

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I'll be playing with hard and soft wood so I guess that 1/4" shank would be fine. Thanks for your input once again.
I prefer to use 1/2in shank bits where possible, less vibration/chatter.

Look for carbide tipped bits. They last longer than HSS.

Spiral upcut or downcut, depending on hand held or table use are good for routing dado's.

Roundover bits of various radii are very useful to soften the edge of projects.

I use my slot cutter bits for cutting mortises in the edges of board.
 

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A quick word on router bit sets - they are great as beginner sets. I bought a set of 24 for @$100 and some of the bits I haven't even touched after 10 years - lots are still good - but a few have been replaced. It boils down to this. A set is good to have for its' versatility and choice of bits. But a few bits you will use more often then others and you will need to replace them in time. When that time comes - invest in a high quality single bit because you know it will be a go too bit.
 

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That's the route I've chosen too, buy the single bits in better quality as I need them.
 

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Looks like they sell Makita saws. I have a Makita 5007MG 7 1/4 inch circular saw and when combined with a Diablo 60Tooth blade, makes very smooth cuts (rips and crosscuts). I have cut 2 inch thick maple and 1 1/2 oak with good results each time.

I use the saw for mostly shop use. Haven't done any construction type work with it and don't have any plans to do it any time soon.

Here is a pic of the maple table top I cut to length and width using a straight edge and the above mentioned saw/blade combo.
Hope this helps.
Mike
 

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What?!?!!?!

Don't you know you can't make furniture with a circular saw???

They're only good for carpentry work. I'm sure I read that on the internet somewhere.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Well, I guess I didn't quite explain what I do for a living, I'm an electrician. lol :) The tools that I have for the field real isn't funny

Skill 77 worm drive
Milwaukee Hole Hog
90 Degree Milwaukee Drill
1/2" Milwaukee Drill
And then comes the DeWalt cordless !!!!!!! 7 different tools, including a jig saw. :) lol
And that is just the stuff that can be used for wood!

I really do appreciate everyone's input and help! I was thinking about the clamps, but already own 14 QuickGrips in 3 sizes, 6", 12", & 24", but no 36". Once again, thanks goes out to everyone. I'll have to take a better look at what they have in the store, I figure it is going to be $150 - $200.
 
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