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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello.

I am trying replace the baseboards in a room and there is a corner where the baseboard trim meets the baseboard heat. Right now the trim just ends somewhere in front of the heat and there's a gap showing the bottom of the drywall. I am wondering if anyone has any elegant idea on how to end the trim so that it would minimize the gap? The new baseboard is about 4 inches tall so it would go beyond the flat part of the heat at the bottom.

Any idea is greatly appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think that the front of the rad and the flap on the end should be able to be moved a bit to the left so your molding would go behind the rad.
Thanks. I could push the cover to the left, but the water pipe goes into the wall where the baseboard trim goes. So if I push the cover to the left by 9/16", then I see the pipe and the drywall cutout for the pipe.

Sorry.... I know I am picky. :laughing:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You could do something like this to cover all the baseboard heat in the room.
Very nice. Thank you for the idea. Is there any issue replacing the metal covers with wood, in terms of fire hazard? Any particular type of wood that needs to be used and clearance between the wood and the fins around the pipe?

Thank you again.

Also, I came up with another idea. Not sure if it would look good though. Thinking about running baseboard up vertically and then turn to meet the end of the wall. Any thoughts?
 

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Carpenter saving lives!
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Since this is hot water heat, the temp can only get up to 212*, however, the wood is kept away from the heater tubes by the mounting brackets used to mount the metal cover plate. Also, you are using air circulation to cool the wood because of convection of the heat through the top of the cover. The hot water heat probably does not get hot enough to start a fire. I am currently making these for a friend and he is using pine for the covers.

Hope this helps.
 

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Carpenter saving lives!
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I removed the large metal plates on the front and turned the adjustable one fully open, and left the back one in place and used a mounting strip of wood on the backside to attach it to the studs in the wall with screws. The metal brackets(holding the pipes to the wall), get fully covered up by the covers.



Here are the measurements that I used. I also added 45* angles to stiffen up the end pieces, so when a vacuum cleaner hits the edge the glue does not break loose. Everything is glued stapled from the back side to hide all the fasteners.
 
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