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I need to install baseboad in our basement. I would like to get pieces that could span the larger walls, but I have no way of transporting them. What is the best way of joining two pieces mid-wall, and still having a finished look? I am planning on using oak baseboard which I will be finishing myself. Any tips would be greatly appreciated!!
 

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Transport

Go to u-haul and rent a truck for $30.00 or so. The fewer joints you have, the better the job will look when it is done.

Ed
 

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If you don't want to rent the truck then when you join two peices together try to put the joint as close to a corner as possible. Also you will want to angle the joint so that you are not looking into it when standing in the room. This will make the joint almost dissappear. Also try to match the color of the wood so you don't have strong contrasting colors which will make the joint stand out.
 

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Just do the old tried and true 45/45 method. You cut the underlap 45 on the furthermost piece from your most common point of view, and then the overlap 45 will cover it up. It's like with vinyl siding, you can hide the seams from view from one direction. Real easy if you have a compound MS, if not then you have to be able to stand the base on edge. FWIW, Rod.
 

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Maybe this is too late for your case, but may help someone else. Add to the other tips...board selection. There is nothing worse than two boards joined together that have totally different grain. No matter how great the joinery, a horrendous change in grain pattern will make it ugly.
 

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A great way to join two boards is to cut as everyone has said....but...another way to get a nice tranistion between the two miters is 22 1/2 degree angles on both boards. It is easier to join the two that way not 45 degree. Also....cut the board at the lumber yard and you will have the same board and grain. Make sure of course that the board is a bit longer so you land on a stud. P.S. Don't forget to raise the base for carpet ect..... what ever you are installing on the floor has to be considered....Right??
 

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A great way to join two boards is to cut as everyone has said....but...another way to get a nice tranistion between the two miters is 22 1/2 degree angles on both boards. It is easier to join the two that way not 45 degree. Also....cut the board at the lumber yard and you will have the same board and grain. Make sure of course that the board is a bit longer so you land on a stud. P.S. Don't forget to raise the base for carpet ect..... what ever you are installing on the floor has to be considered....Right??

Agree about the 22.5...just be careful the stud your break is on is not one of those pesky occasional stand outs that will make your joint look horrible no matter how much sanding you do.
 

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Whenever I install baseboard molding, I use an acute cute to overlap the two pieces but I bring the top piece over the bottom piece a tad beyond where it should be. Then, when the nail is driven in and it pulls the top piece tightly against the bottom piece, the top piece moves slightly and the joint almost disappears completely.
 

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There is alot of good advise here. there are a number of ways to avoid splicing base. Wall collumns, built-ins, and wainscotting, just to mension three. but you can`t eliminate it. The best way I`ve found is to use a vertical slice at 30 degrees ... It`s easer to snap in place. Angle the slice away from the traffic area. It`s good to hit a stud ... but It`s also good to have a flat wall too. Rick
 

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I need to install baseboad in our basement. I would like to get pieces that could span the larger walls, but I have no way of transporting them.
I have hauled some very long pieces by tieing them to the side
of my car with twine from the engine compartment and trunk.
Duct tape holds it against the doors from flapping. :thumbsup:
 

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oh Jc..

I Hate to say it but JC is right.. You can haul some awfully long trim pieces home like that... It may not look fashionable or fancy but hey don't worry.. Or better yet, check your neighborhood out and see if there is a contractor working with a truck and truck rack.. Normally they will be going to the store anyway and you would be surprised what $5.00 will do..

Of course I remember after my divorce and the land of broke and the strap and tape worked great... Hell still does if I am in a big pinch... Good luck and goo trimming....
 

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Transporting your lumber like that is all well and good but what the heck does your car look like afterwards?, You better put your trim boards face to face cause some of the car paint might end up on yer boards. Heh, heh, heh. Just kidding, unless of course you're driving a brand-new caddy. The important thing is getting that lumber home in one piece so you can start pounding'em up. ROLe.:laughing:
 

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Add to the other tips...board selection. There is nothing worse than two boards joined together that have totally different grain. No matter how great the joinery, a horrendous change in grain pattern will make it ugly.
One way you might be able to avoid this is if you buy a large peice in the store and get it cut into peices you can transport, there's a lot better chance of grain match. If you do this, however, I'd make sure they miter the cut on the first go, otherwise you might loose too much material and the grain pattern will be off. Not a perfect Solution, but possible.

Also, if you do this, I wouldn't cut them all the same length, the human eye looks for patterns and would notice if there was a line every 4 feet. Try to pick places where the grain is relatively straight so there's less worry about drift and try to keep the distances variable. But that's just the advice of this Very novice beginner.
 

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For what it's worth, I drive a Honda Accord and have a roof rack I use for damn near everything. I've carried 12' and I believe 16' sections of baseboard and crown molding on my car with no problems. If you're really worried about flex, buy 2 $2 2x4 studs and put them under the baseboard tying the baseboard to the very ends. That way, you have the middle 8 feet of the baseboard supported and (at most) 4 feet on each end that won't flex very much at all. Works like a charm every time I do it. I also then have "spare" 2x4s for use in framing up my basement or other projects where I need cheap materials.
 

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One more little tip for those long, floppy boards is to tape or tie the leading end together so the wind doesn't break your lumber. The wind will break them one at a time but not the whole bundle.
 
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