Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking to build 4 bar stools. Basically, I want clean lines in their design. They will be a bit on the higher side ... something like 35 inches seat height. I've attached a pic of a stool-type that may work for me but I would appreciate opinions on the joinery that would be required for these stools, or with a height of 35 inches, would this style be too flimsy and prone to racking? All ideas/comments greatly appreciated.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
I and no one else, has any idea of your skill level, what you have for tools, etc.
Those pictures look like its pretty much all mortise and tenon joints, with tapered legs. Frankly, my opinion is that if you don't have the confidance to tackle these stools, you need to get a book or two, that will help you design what you want, or have plans and directions. Remember, all designs are basically the same. All that's different is the cosmetic look it ends up at. I doubt if you going to find any answers on a on-line forum. You need to sit down and read techniques, tools needed, figure out a material list and design. You can take any design, you find, and alter it to fit your specs. Changing a seat from 30'' off the floor to 35" or any other within reason.
START READING!

woodchuck1954
"A Legend in his own Mind"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Chuck, did you wake up on the wrong side of the bed? And I do read. If you are going to be all cranky, don't write a response.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
615 Posts
Like he said, mortise and tenon joinery. I don't think it'll be prone to taking depending on how well the joints are done, material size, and thickness.
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,017 Posts
I would make them with M&T's for the seat to the legs, and M&T's for the stretchers to the legs. For a stool 35", high is actually an inch short of standard stool height of 36" for a bar height of 42".

If your joinery fits well, the stool should be sturdy. The design will permit movements from side to side with weight on the seat fairly well. Because of the stock size of the legs, and what little room there is for a sizeable tenon from the stretchers, there may be some axial movement. That is twisting induced through the legs from someone turning on the seat.

I would use a hardwood, like Oak or Walnut and try to keep the stock for the legs and stretchers large enough, while still maintaining that look.






.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,439 Posts
And don't forget...the straighter the grain the better...Stock choice will be key in such a project.
 

·
Wood Snob
Joined
·
5,963 Posts
patrick2165 said:
I'm looking to build 4 bar stools. Basically, I want clean lines in their design. They will be a bit on the higher side ... something like 35 inches seat height. I've attached a pic of a stool-type that may work for me but I would appreciate opinions on the joinery that would be required for these stools, or with a height of 35 inches, would this style be too flimsy and prone to racking? All ideas/comments greatly appreciated.
Patric
I think your only and best joint would be M and T. I just finished building 6 dining chairs using a floating M and T joint. They can all be cut with a router. Feel free to look at the pictures of them in my profile. I stopped posting my own threads due to posts like your sweetheart post # 2.

Also taking a closer look at your last picture. It would appear that the seats are made up of narrow pieces glued together. Which adds strength to the mentioned problems a stool can have.

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.
 

·
Wood Snob
Joined
·
5,963 Posts
Patric

I'd also like to add.

Make all the legs without the taper first. Then cut all the MTs. This way you can set them in your fixture in the same manor only requiring one set up. No left or right, front or back. Same with the seats. After the joints are cut and fit you can choose which way to group them by grain and color. Then before glue up. Taper route and sand everything. You may want to leave that round over on the seat till after glue up to make clamping it to the legs easier. Be neat with the glue up and save lots of time final sanding.

BTW my next project is going to be three bar stools.

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top