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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am one lower blade guide (the rear one) away from getting my Backus bandsaw up and running. The guide is meant to slide on the center post (3/8" OD) for adjustment while the post itself is hollowed out (1/4" ID) to sit n' spin on a spike on the lower unit itself. The two pieces do not want to budge. I have tried (in no particular order) gentle hammering, not so gentle twisting (note the pliers marks), naval jelly, WD40, Diet Coke, Evapo-rust, a C-clamp, harsh words, and an evil stare.




I know the outer piece is the one I really need. Adding to my frustration is its current fused position is too far forward for the 1/2" blade to pass through the other guides and should I get it loose there is probably not enough post to properly set for a 1/2" blade even though it could go back further if the closed-end center post wasn't bottoming out on its mounting spot. The upper unit has no issues with the blade guide and I can get everything to track properly without this last piece in.

So my question ends up being: (1) how to get the center post out without damaging the guide piece? and (2) can/should I substitute an open-ended piece of iron pipe (3/8" OD, 1/4" ID) for the current one?

Regards,
Steve
 

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Could you hammer them apart by setting the assembly up on a small piece of metal that would support the inner piece, and then putting a piece of pipe on top and hitting that?

Acer
 

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some of both

Could you hammer them apart by setting the assembly up on a small piece of metal that would support the inner piece, and then putting a piece of pipe on top and hitting that?

Acer
After trying a soaking in Kroil or other rust penetrant, use a socket set, a large socket on the bottom and a smaller one one top corresponding to the diameter of the pin, and hammer the pin out.
Rust Buster or Evaporust will work if left overnight in a plastic container. Heating with a Propane torch will work when all else fails, however it will draw the temper from the hardened disc, not good. You would have to reharden it by quenching it while hot.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Case_hardening
 

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Could you hammer them apart by setting the assembly up on a small piece of metal that would support the inner piece, and then putting a piece of pipe on top and hitting that?

Acer
I like your idea. However, you need to support it on something more substantial than a "small" piece of metal. I think you could support it on the top of a vice.

Do not clamp the jaws of the vice on the center piece. Just let the assembly rest on the vice with the center piece downward. Then find or make a piece the same size as the center. Then drive it out.

George
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The best rust penetrant on the market is KROIL. Not in the average store, but it worth getting.
Thanks for the tip. I was googling for a local store that carried it and came across an acetone:ATF (1:1) mixture said to work as good. I'm going to give that a whirl first since I have both of those on hand. I'll order some Kroil if that doesn't work it out.

Rust Buster or Evaporust will work if left overnight in a plastic container. Heating with a Propane torch will work when all else fails, however it will draw the temper from the hardened disc, not good. You would have to reharden it by quenching it while hot.
The Evaporust I have may be bad (free from the county re-use) as it didn't really do much of anything. The torch route is one I really want to avoid.

Could you hammer them apart by setting the assembly up on a small piece of metal that would support the inner piece, and then putting a piece of pipe on top and hitting that?
I like your idea. However, you need to support it on something more substantial than a "small" piece of metal. I think you could support it on the top of a vice.

Do not clamp the jaws of the vice on the center piece. Just let the assembly rest on the vice with the center piece downward. Then find or make a piece the same size as the center. Then drive it out.
I done similar using a piece of oak scrap with a slightly larger than 3/8" hole drilled in it. The piece is flat on the backside and proud on top, so I have been coming at it from the top side. I'll keep these variation in mind when going at it tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
The acetone:ATF (automatic transmission fluid) concoction seems to have done the trick. It started moving with some relatively gentle tapping.

 

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Frozen door lock mechanisms for my Suburban are $135 each, from GMC.
Technician told me to buy "Liquid Film" penetrating lubricant (maybe $20?) , NOT WD-40.
Fixed 2 locks with that, saving $235.00 + labor. One was no-hope.
Whether it would have worked in the BS part, I don't know but in my door locks,
it was pure magic = big squirt, wait 15 minutes. Click!
 
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