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Thanks for posting. I watched it all the way through then immediately went to re-tune my bandsaw.

Removing the table is a pain, but he is correct, it makes the tuning so much easier.

This is the first time I have seen anyone recommend the bottom of the blade gullet should be in the centre of the tyre. I am now trying this.

I liked his way to test for the table being 90 deg. Mine was, but his method is quick and easy.

I have the discs for the side of the blade support. It turned out the brass sleeves in which the discs rotate needed lubrication. Very timely cleanup and re-lube.

I will be interested how the next re-saw goes.
 

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I saw him do this at the Woodworking Show in March. Great information. I recently set up my saw using his technique (though I realized just rewatching that I forgot to take off the table :eek:).
 

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where's my table saw?
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I learned something also

I learned from the vid, but I almost felt that he was selling a "Veg-O-Matic". Talk about a machine gun presentation. :blink:
Bill
As many times as I have set up a bandsaw, new, or used, or just a reset, I never knew that co-planer wheels is not desirable!!! And there's a reason. ... so the blade will "stay" where you set it on the tires.

Thanks. and yes the salesman/pitchman/demo guy is just that, but he seems to know what he's doing. I've always done what he's advocating in the video. :yes: bill
 

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He works for Kreg and goes to all of the woodworking shows. If you want to see a truly impressive bandsaw video, look for a video titled "Mastering Your Bandsaw" by Mark Duginske. It's about an hour long but what he can do with bandsaw might leave you impressed.
 

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I watched the video yesterday and spent about an hour cleaning and re-tuning my Jet 14" bandsaw. It was definitely easier to do with the table off, but I had to remove the rear guide for my fence so the table would rotate enough.

When I was done, a quick resaw cut with a 3/8" blade on some scrap plywood gave me a better cut (less drift), but it still wanted to drift some. It may be more due to an old blade.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I watched the video yesterday and spent about an hour cleaning and re-tuning my Jet 14" bandsaw. It was definitely easier to do with the table off, but I had to remove the rear guide for my fence so the table would rotate enough.

When I was done, a quick resaw cut with a 3/8" blade on some scrap plywood gave me a better cut (less drift), but it still wanted to drift some. It may be more due to an old blade.
what i would go is get a board and make a 1" mark down with a streight like and saw down tell the edge is and the table. Now don't let it move . get your T bevel and set it to the wood and table tighten it down. now take the board out and put fence on and move over tell the T bevel is on the table and the blade part is agains't the fence if their is a space than loosen up bolt's and move the fence tell it is aligned with the T bevel . Now you will have no blade drift. You should be able to push wood and saw with any hard push agains't the fence other than keeping it on the fence. should not want to go to the right? good luck. del
 

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Sorry for bringing up an older thread, but I just got my first bandsaw (Ridgid 14") and wanted to make sure I had it set up properly, so I did a google search and it brought me to this site. The vid posted here is really great, and I'll be heading home tonight to make sure things are tuned up as they should be. I've already tuned it up once using other info I found out there, but I'm anxious to try his method.

I was floored when he said that the wheels should NOT be coplanar. I spent a considerable amount of time manufacturing a bushing to get mine to be :censored:.

I tried resawing some maple and walnut this weekend, and got very poor results. I just purchased a new 1/2" 4 tpi Timber Wolf blade, so I'm confident that that's not the problem. I'll give this tune up method a shot and see how my luck fares afterward.

BTW, thanks for such a great forum guys. I've started building electric guitars as a hobby and definitely need to step up my woodworking game. This looks like just the place to do that.
 

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Sorry for bringing up an older thread, but I just got my first bandsaw (Ridgid 14") and wanted to make sure I had it set up properly, so I did a google search and it brought me to this site. The vid posted here is really great, and I'll be heading home tonight to make sure things are tuned up as they should be. I've already tuned it up once using other info I found out there, but I'm anxious to try his method.

I was floored when he said that the wheels should NOT be coplanar. I spent a considerable amount of time manufacturing a bushing to get mine to be :censored:.

I tried resawing some maple and walnut this weekend, and got very poor results. I just purchased a new 1/2" 4 tpi Timber Wolf blade, so I'm confident that that's not the problem. I'll give this tune up method a shot and see how my luck fares afterward.

BTW, thanks for such a great forum guys. I've started building electric guitars as a hobby and definitely need to step up my woodworking game. This looks like just the place to do that.
I had seen other videos, I also purchased the Mark Duginski book. I thought my bandsaw was tuned.

I watched Alex's video and was very surprised, as you were, at some of the advise. For me the setting of the blade on the top wheel centering the teeth on the wheel, not the overall blade.

The same day I went down to re-tune to Alex's recommendations. The saw now runs so smooth. A good blade like Timberwolf is always needed. I have a Timberwolf running at the moment. The machine performs better. If I did not see the blur of the teeth, I would not know the blade was moving.
 

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Sorry for bringing up an older thread, but I just got my first bandsaw (Ridgid 14") and wanted to make sure I had it set up properly, so I did a google search and it brought me to this site. The vid posted here is really great, and I'll be heading home tonight to make sure things are tuned up as they should be. I've already tuned it up once using other info I found out there, but I'm anxious to try his method.

I was floored when he said that the wheels should NOT be coplanar. I spent a considerable amount of time manufacturing a bushing to get mine to be :censored:.

I tried resawing some maple and walnut this weekend, and got very poor results. I just purchased a new 1/2" 4 tpi Timber Wolf blade, so I'm confident that that's not the problem. I'll give this tune up method a shot and see how my luck fares afterward.

BTW, thanks for such a great forum guys. I've started building electric guitars as a hobby and definitely need to step up my woodworking game. This looks like just the place to do that.
congrats on your recent BS purchase. i'd check out the ridgid forum as there are numerous threads there dealing with some of the 1400s unfortunate limitations.

http://www.ridgid.com/

"I just purchased a new 1/2" 4 tpi Timber Wolf blade, so I'm confident that that's not the problem." when i got an 18" jet BS, i thought the same thing. 4 successive timberwolf blades from suffolk machinery all had defective welds. i'd strongly suggest returning that blade and contact iturra design here (no web site):

http://www.manta.com/c/mmc3znn/iturra-design

iturra really knows how to weld a BS blade and the blade has an incredible affect on the performance of a band saw. also, check the wheels for balance and add a snug piece of MDF or plywood to the saw's leg set to stiffen the entire arrangement.

BTW, is your saw one of the older gray models or the newer orange saws? the older gray tools carry a lifetime guaranty against manufacturing defects regardless of ownership.

good luck and enjoy your new saw.
 

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Thanks, guys.

My saw is one of the new orange ones, but I bought it used... for $80, so I'm not terribly disappointed in the performance. I've done quite a bit of research on the inherent defects of this saw and have already balanced the wheel. My next course will be to remove the rubber motor mounts and set everything up on a piece of 34" mdf just as you mention, toolguy. I'll also replace the drive belt while I'm at it.

I'll look into those other blades at some point, but right now there are so many other variables that I have to nail down first. I'm sure once I address those and then tune it properly, I'll be good to go for my needs. BTW, here's a shot of one of my maple slices. You can see how poorly it came out.

 

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$80 was a great deal. judging from the offcut, that saw appears to still be vibrating quite a bit. replacing the drive belt with a link belt will do wonders for the saw. i'd still get a properly welded blade from iturra. that alone improved the performance of my former jet BS 200% from this:


to this (note the nickel to the left of the blade):

 

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WOW! That's a pretty substantial difference, toolguy.
i'll never use another timberwolf blade. they are cheap for a reason. that change in performance was attributable solely to a lennox blade from iturra design. he did more to help that crappy 18" jet BS than jet's tech support and an authorized jet dealer combined.
 
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