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broke rookie
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So on a whim I bought a small bench top delta bandsaw for 60 bucks on craigslist. I get it home put a blade on and try to tune it, (first bandsaw ever) and it works but there is a bit of a shreik before I even try to cut wood. I got most of the shriek to go away but I'm afraid that I have the blade too loose. there is also a bit of vibration as the blade slows to a stop, tires not aligned? I would love to just get a bigger better one but space of course and money are problems. not looking to resaw or anything just some small stuff, toys for the kids and what not. Any advice would be appreciated.

thanks, Ken
 

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You need to determine where the 'shriek' is coming from.. bearings? guides? thrust bearing? What did you do to make it better? Is it continuous, intermittent or only at a certain time (startup / shutdown)? What is the general condition of the machine and did it sit idle for a long period of time before you bought it? More info!!!

Cheers,
Brad
 

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Out of curiosity, is it a two-wheeler that looks something like this?




Or is it a three-wheeler that looks like this one?



The three wheelers can be troublesome and tend to break blades easily.

Bill
 

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broke rookie
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes it is a two wheel model like the first pic. When I turn the bottom wheel by hand there is a slight grinding noise bearings maybe I suppose that is where the shreik is coming from.
 

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broke rookie
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
To make some of the noise go away I slowly let up on the tension. I also adjusted the blocks so they weren't touching the blade. I will watch that vid as soon as I get off work
 

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I also think the first step is finding where the noise is comming from. With the noise and the vibration I would suspect the bearing on the upper wheel has gone bad. More than likely it can be replaced with a stock bearing.
 

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Here are some reasons why band saw is noisy. Try running the saw without blade too and listen to the motor. If it's not noisy, you may need to buy new blade.
 

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Isolate the problem.. take the belt off the motor and run it to verify it is quiet. With the belt off, spin the lower wheel to see if it makes any noise. Then do as Gus suggests; put the belt back on and take the blade off to see if the noise persists. With the blade still off, spin the upper wheel by hand to see if you hear any noise. Your comment about spinning the lower wheel and hearing a grinding noise points to a possible bad bearing. How old is the machine? The grease in sealed bearings will dry up over time and lack of use. Fortunately, bearings are stock items, fairly inexpensive and easy to replace. Just make sure you buy them from a reputable bearing supplier like Accurate Bearing so you know they are fresh and from a quality manufacturer. Stay away from auto parts stores and cheap e-bay deals. I tend to replace bearings on old machines regardless, even if they seem fine, as you never know how much abuse or lack of attention a used machine may have received in it's previous life. It's cheap insurance and in the process you may discover some other problems that you might not have seen otherwise.

Cheers,
Brad
 

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Brad said: <<Stay away from auto parts stores and cheap e-bay deals. >>

I'd have to disagree with avoiding the auto parts stores. Most sell brand name bearings that are engineered to live a life in an automobile environment that may be far more harsh then what they would be subject to in a woodworking machine. You may or may not be able to get a decent bearing on eBay. It depends on the brand and the ABEC rating (more is better). That's not to take anything away from Accurate Bearing, who have a stellar reputation.

Bill
 

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I agree, most auto parts stores sell good bearings...I've bought many a set of timkin bearings from auto stores...the abuse a car will put on a set of bearings is likely far more than you'll be able I do with a band saw.
 

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The problem with auto part stores and similar outlets is volume, not quality (although quality can be a problem with them sometimes as well). Since many of the bearings used in machinery are not 'common' ones used in the automotive industry (which are mostly tapered roller bearings, not deep groove radials), their turnover is infrequent. Bearings have a shelf life; the grease used will dry out after a given amount of time and inactivity. Suppliers who are constantly replenishing their stock due to high turnover will ensure that you get fresh bearings. I once purchased a set of fairly common 6203-2RS bearings from my local NAPA store.. and they turned out to be almost 6 years old! Just imagine if I was looking for something a little less common (which many of these machines use). Just saying.. you may get lucky, or may not. If you stick with a bearing supplier who does nothing but turnover bearings, you don't have to worry. YMMV.

Cheers,
Brad
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
that video was amazing I watched it twice. I figured out the sound was comming from the guide bearing under the table. I adjusted according to the video and she purrs now. also put a little drop of oil in the bearing. got the blade adjusted now to cut some wood!

thanks for all your help guys couldn't have done it with out you!
 

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<<Since many of the bearings used in machinery are not 'common' ones used in the automotive industry... >>

Again, I must respectfully disagree. Many of the bearing we find in our woodworking machines are used as bearings in automobiles and other equipment. What might be an arbor bearing in my Unisaw could be a power steering pump bearing in your Chevy (In fact, I got new arbor bearings for my Unisaw at an auto parts store and they were bearings used in many automotive applications - the clerk knew the bearing number as soon as she saw them). Alternators, A/C compressors, clutch pilot bearings, starters, etc., all often use common bearings that can often be found on lots of industrial equipment.

When engineers design a new part, they avoid having to use proprietary bearings to reduce cost. Because of that we have standardized bearings that are used in many industries.

You said that automotive bearings <<..are mostly tapered roller bearings, not deep groove radials..>> Automobiles use tapered roller bearing for wheel bearings, axles, etc, but you are forgetting all the other accessory applications. Also, if you are worried about shelf life, how long do you think the bearings from a woodworking machine supply company have been sitting on the shelf? I don't know either. I do know that my local auto parts store is a busy one and has a pretty good turnover on their parts.

One thing to be cautious about when buying bearings for woodworking is the type of seal or shielding that's used. Metal shields can let fine dust through. Stick with bearings that have rubber or plastic seals.

Bill
 

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-- Again, I must respectfully disagree --

Disagreement respectfully acknowledged :thumbsup:

Cheers,
Brad

PS: Most reputable bearing manufacturers put a date code on the packaging so you can tell how long it's been sitting on the shelf.
 

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Just for general information, if you end up in a situation like Brad mentioned where you fear you got a set of bearings that may have old grease in them, there's a solution. With sealed bearings (not metal shielded) if you are real careful you can pop one of the seals off.

I did this recently to an inexpensive set of eBay bearings I got for my lawn mower arbors. I used the tip of a utility knife (a jewelers screwdriver might work, too) to get under the edge of the rubber/plastic seal and pop it off. I added some synthetic grease to what was there and popped the seal back on with my fingers. Just be careful not to slice, bend or mangle that seal!

Bill
 
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