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My dad gave me his old craftsman bandsaw. We plugged it up and ran it with no problems at his house. I brought it home, plugged it up and it ran for a couple seconds and it quit. I checked the outlet and it had tripped. None of my other tools are causing it to trip. Any ideas on what to check or do? Thanks!
 

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where's my table saw?
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could be the GFI...?

It could also be a faulty wiring connection within the plug, switch or motor. GFI's are temperamental also. Try it in a standard outlet AFTER you've checked the wiring. If you don't have the means or experience to check it call in an electrician.
 

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GFCI's work by sensing a fluctuation of electric current. It just doesn't work well to run equipment off of them. I would run a different line for the bandsaw that wasn't on a GFCI unless the bandsaw is in a wet location.
 

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Old Methane Gas Cloud
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A bill said "temperamental".

Generally speaking, the GFI measures the current going into the device (Black wire) vs. the current coming out of the device (White wire). If there is a loss the GFI trips.

The theory is that the current is leaving the device and going through the user. A little bit of loss won't hurt you but a lot will kill you.

First and the easiest, replace the plug. If that doesn't fix the problem try replacing the power cord.

Try looking for any of the wiring touching the frame or other metal part of the saw.

If none of these seem to solve the problem, there is probably current leakage in the motor. A motor shop might be able to help solve the problem but probably you'll need a new motor.

BTW - Insulation failure in electric motors is not uncommon.
 

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Unless you are operating in a wet environment, you should not be using a GFCI circuit and instead use a dedicated circuit with proper grounding. Nuisance tripping of a GFCI circuit can be caused by improper wiring, such as using a long extension cord or on a circuit that is longer than 100 feet. Other devices on the circuit, such as Fluorescent or other types of electric-discharge lighting fixtures can also cause problems. If none of these apply, then there is a problem with the machine that needs to be traced down and eliminated.

Cheers,
Brad
 

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I agree that it's most likely a problem with the saw itself. It might simply be just a nick in the power cord.
All of the receptacles in my basement workshop are GFCI protected and I have never had an issue with nuisance tripping when any of my tools are plugged into them.
 

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Faulty wiring or motor shorted. Was there smoke? Have you tried plugging it on different outlet? You should probably see an electrician .
 
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