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That's nice. I just picked one up today to. I got it fir $5 but yours looks in better condition. Mine doesn't have a date on it.
 

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Nice find for $25. :thumbsup:

The blade has lost some metal, full length would cover the lateral adjustment leverl

Does the lateral adjustment lever have a patent date before the STANLEY stamp?

Dominick's is not as old, but his is in very good condition and he "stole" it for only $5.
 

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Alchymist - by the 1920's, Bailey planes had tall knobs and the "sweetheart" logo on the irons -- yours looks to be pre-turn of the century to about 1907 (or thereabouts).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Nice find for $25. :thumbsup:

The blade has lost some metal, full length would cover the lateral adjustment leverl

Does the lateral adjustment lever have a patent date before the STANLEY stamp?

Dominick's is not as old, but his is in very good condition and he "stole" it for only $5.
Nothing on the lever but the word "Stanley" as shown.

Alchymist - by the 1920's, Bailey planes had tall knobs and the "sweetheart" logo on the irons -- yours looks to be pre-turn of the century to about 1907 (or thereabouts).
Interesting - grabbed the "circa 1925" date from the websites posted above....??
 

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Nothing on the lever but the word "Stanley" as shown.

Interesting - grabbed the "circa 1925" date from the websites posted above....??
The casting, low knob, lever cap without STANLEY embossed and lateral adjustment lever feel like in the period Type 9 - 11. Casting details would confirm closer.

So anywhere from 1902 - 1918.

The blade does not fit the age of the plane. Likely a much later blade.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I,m still leaning to 1910+, it has the patent date behind frog, APR-19-10.
 

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Not sure what that means -- The logo style as that which appears on the OP's blade was in use from about 1888-1907.
It means my eyes are not what they used to be. I read "1992". Did not see the comma or the APL, so did not read "APL 19, 92" inferring 1892.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Why is it so hard to match up dates to some of the Stanley planes? Here's two more I have - the first is 13-1/2" long, no lettering in the casting, only marking is the Stanley on the blade, and the "Made In USA" on the toe. Spent a long time on various websites, gather it's 1940-50 era, but none that I found matched exactly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Here's the second one, little block plane that I probably spent more time restoring than it was worth ...was really rusty. Again same era from what I can find, nothing matches 100%.
 

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Why is it so hard to match up dates to some of the Stanley planes? Here's two more I have - the first is 13-1/2" long, no lettering in the casting, only marking is the Stanley on the blade, and the "Made In USA" on the toe. Spent a long time on various websites, gather it's 1940-50 era, but none that I found matched exactly.
I appreciate your frustration.

Since so many companies copied the Stanley-Bailey design as the patents expired, there are many, many components which are interchangeable.

To compound the frustration, Stanley made many planes to be sold under different Stanley brands, e.g., Defiance and also under what we call today "Store Brand" names.

Some "Store Brand" planes made by Stanley, Sargent, Millers Falls, etc. would only have "Made in the USA" on the casting.

I will not be surprised if your 13 1/2in plane, about a No. 5 equivalent is made from components from more than one manufacturer.

It is also possible the blade may be original or may have been a later replacement.

I would try and match the features to an equivalent Stanley to get as close as you can to a date.

http://www.hyperkitten.com/tools/stanley_bench_plane/start_flowchart.php
 

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Another reason many planes don't exactly "fit" dating charts is that even though new designs/features were developed and incorporated, they still used any old parts that were in the bin while putting them together.

It is very common for planes to span "types" with original parts, even if they at first appear to have been pieced together by various owners over the years.
 
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