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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,

I am new here and have a bit strange question. I have searched older topics but couldn't find anything similar to my problem.
I painted a table top and covered it with big sheet of paper I had around to protect it. After a week or so, I sprayed water based polyurethane and noticed beading on certain spots. Those spots matched places where sheet of paper was pressed onto the table top.
I figured out that paper was waxed and wax was impressed to painted table top.
Is there anything I can do beside stripping everything?

Perkan
 

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We have an introduction section where you can say a few words about yourself. If you fill out your profile in your "User Control Panel", you can list any hobbies, experience or other facts. You can also list your general geographical location which would be a help in answering some questions.

Without knowing what paint was initially used and when, or having knowledge on the paper you used, I would scuff sand with 320x the surface and spray thin applications of the WB poly. See if that works before you take any other action.










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Hi guys,

I am new here and have a bit strange question. I have searched older topics but couldn't find anything similar to my problem.
I painted a table top and covered it with big sheet of paper I had around to protect it. After a week or so, I sprayed water based polyurethane and noticed beading on certain spots. Those spots matched places where sheet of paper was pressed onto the table top.
I figured out that paper was waxed and wax was impressed to painted table top.
Is there anything I can do beside stripping everything?

Perkan
If it was a used table it might also be due to furniture polish on the table. Many furniture polishes especially the aerosol kind contain silicone which is troublesome with finishing. If this is what happened you can add a silicone additive to the finish and it will make it flow out. I use a product called smoothie available at places that sell automotive paint.

If it was due to wax from the paper then I would clean the table off with a wax and grease remover frequently changing rags. Then sand the finish with 220 grit paper and give it another coat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The thing is that right now those waxy spots are covered with polyurethane and they look like eczema. I will try to sand it with 320 gently :)
I'd like to avoid stripping because there are two coats of primer, 3 coats of paint, some wax and two coats of polyurethane on top of that.

I'll let you know the result.

Thanks guys,
Perkan
 

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This is kind of an extreame example but the finish pictured shows "Fisheye". It can happen to any finish including clear coatings. This is normally caused by silicone. If what you are experiencing looks anything like this I wouldn't sand it too much. I would just scuff sand it and apply another coat with some Smoothie additive. It would make the finish adhere to the voids and with sanding between coats you can level the finish. It's just that if you do much sanding you will sand through the finish. Also when you are done dispose of the sandpaper you use. The smoothie is silicone and if you use the sandpaper on something else you will transfer the problem to another project.
 

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This is kind of an extreame example but the finish pictured shows "Fisheye". It can happen to any finish including clear coatings. This is normally caused by silicone. If what you are experiencing looks anything like this I wouldn't sand it too much. I would just scuff sand it and apply another coat with some Smoothie additive. It would make the finish adhere to the voids and with sanding between coats you can level the finish. It's just that if you do much sanding you will sand through the finish. Also when you are done dispose of the sandpaper you use. The smoothie is silicone and if you use the sandpaper on something else you will transfer the problem to another project.
FWIW, if you need to add smoothie (or any fisheye remover), you already have contamination. In adding more silicone, you compound the problem. You can contaminate the shop area, spray equipment, and it can be impossible to remove the problem.

I know you disagree with this, but you're entitled to your opinion. Do a search!!! This is not an uncommon problem, and those starting out with finishing should be aware. Because you may not have had a problem doesn't mean the problem isn't real.






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FWIW, if you need to add smoothie (or any fisheye remover), you already have contamination. In adding more silicone, you compound the problem. You can contaminate the shop area, spray equipment, and it can be impossible to remove the problem.

I know you disagree with this, but you're entitled to your opinion. Do a search!!! This is not an uncommon problem, and those starting out with finishing should be aware. Because you may not have had a problem doesn't mean the problem isn't real.










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Actually if you research silicone you would find any experience finisher has little trouble dealing with it. I don't need to search anything. I lived with silicone for 10 years when I owned an antique refinishing shop. I have first hand experience with it, not fantasies. It doesn’t contaminate the shop. I used it on furniture in the same spray room with new construction and other furniture and didn’t contaminate anything spraying it. Once or twice I sanded a piece of furniture with a used piece of sandpaper and transferred the silicone but it was nothing to sweat over. I just included that piece of furniture to the ones I was using smoothie. As far as contamination the spray equipment most refinishers just put smoothie in every batch of finish. I didn't do that. I switched back and forth with finish containing smoothie and some that didn't. Just a little rinse of the gun with lacquer thinner will prevent the contamination problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Update:

I sanded lightly one portion of the bad area and put a coat of paint
over the tabletop, just see if there is any difference between sanded and non-sanded "eczema". And the difference was so small that I decided to put one more coat of paint and it looks good now.
Was it wax or silicon, I am not sure but it was paper that you use to put under hardwood flooring to prevent squeaks (wax I guess).
I learned that it is easy to contaminate work piece with whatever (paper, cloth, clamp, used sandpaper, gloves, etc ...) touches it and I will be more careful about it.

Thanks guys,

Perkan
 

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Update:

I sanded lightly one portion of the bad area and put a coat of paint
over the tabletop, just see if there is any difference between sanded and non-sanded "eczema". And the difference was so small that I decided to put one more coat of paint and it looks good now.
Was it wax or silicon, I am not sure but it was paper that you use to put under hardwood flooring to prevent squeaks (wax I guess).
I learned that it is easy to contaminate work piece with whatever (paper, cloth, clamp, used sandpaper, gloves, etc ...) touches it and I will be more careful about it.

Thanks guys,

Perkan
Yes it is easy. Contamination can come from a variety of sources. It's unfortunate that it may not be discovered until you start your finish.



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Update:

I sanded lightly one portion of the bad area and put a coat of paint
over the tabletop, just see if there is any difference between sanded and non-sanded "eczema". And the difference was so small that I decided to put one more coat of paint and it looks good now.
Was it wax or silicon, I am not sure but it was paper that you use to put under hardwood flooring to prevent squeaks (wax I guess).
I learned that it is easy to contaminate work piece with whatever (paper, cloth, clamp, used sandpaper, gloves, etc ...) touches it and I will be more careful about it.

Thanks guys,

Perkan
I think if it was wax or silicone it wouldn't have gotten better with another coat. Usually with silicone especially it gets more pronounced the more coats you put on because at the early stages much of the finish soaks into the wood instead of beading up.
 
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