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Discussion Starter #1
I got a 16" backsaw during my last junk shop adventure. It is a no name and had a terrible plywood handle. The saw itself looked well made. I de-rusted it and made a new tote out of walnut. The saw nuts are from another rust bucket that was beyond help.

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Discussion Starter #3
No before pic. I get so excited about getting a chance to work on them, that I forget
To take pics. This was the first saw handle I made. Learned a lot.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
This is my next project. This d23 started life as an 11 tpi xcut. I'm making it a 5 1/2 tpi rip. I haven't been able to find any coarse rip saws, so I'm gonna practice my filing skills.

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Got some of the rust off tonight.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Finally done with initial shaping. Now all that's left is re-planing, final shaping, setting, and sharpening. Oh yeah and I need to polish it a bit more and clean up the handle. I'm starting to see y these go for so much from the websites.

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Discussion Starter #10
I sanded the handle just enough
To get the old finish off. Then have it a couple of soaks in Danish oil. Polished the nuts and put it back together. I cut some pine 1x and it ripped about 1" per stroke. This is becoming an addiction.

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This is great to see. I've got a d23 hanging up that's a x cut I don't know what to do with. Maybe I will try making it a rip one day. One thing at a time though. I need to get though a basic sharpening first.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks for all who replied. I posted this to see what kind of feedback I could get. I'm new to this and this gas been a great place to gain knowledge.
 

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In History is the Future
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Looking good so far. It looks like you need to work on keeping the rake more consistent... But maybe it's a trick of the camera, I don't know.

In the picture it looks like the the saw plate has a the rake starts pretty high then decreases from toe to heel. Did you decided on the rake angle prior to filing? Did you use an aid such as a wooden block on the end of the file?

Keep at it! Whats the pitch and set? How does it rip? Is it a tapered plate?
 

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I did it freehand and should have used a guide. I was more worried about keeping the teeth the same height. The rake was about 8 degrees no fleam. Set with a Somax tool. Planed it slightly and sharpened with 1 more pass per tooth. I'm sure the blade is taper ground.
 

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In History is the Future
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I did it freehand and should have used a guide. I was more worried about keeping the teeth the same height. The rake was about 8 degrees no fleam. Set with a Somax tool. Planed it slightly and sharpened with 1 more pass per tooth. I'm sure the blade is taper ground.
I think what I'm seeing stemmed from not removing the old teeth entirely. That makes it tough to maintain a consistent rake while keeping the spacing. I'm not trying to beat you up over the saw, it looks like you did a way better job than my first attempt, just help ya out for the next one.

For what it's worth, this is what I do - If I'm retoothing to a different pitch I remove all trace of the old teeth. Then have my new gullet centers marched out on a grid. I found a hack saw works well to notch it at each center (just one pass) as it's easier to keep on spot and gives a starting point for the file. I file the new teeth by counting the passes on each gullet rather than trying to cut a full gullet prior to proceeding. This helps to keep the teeth even. once it's close to toothed, joint it again then finish toothing and sharpening. That will keep your teeth and gullets even.
 
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