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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have two of these trees down in my yard, cut them up into 18-20" sections. I think they are Ash?

Would they be worth it to have milled and kiln dried or just use them for firewood? I have a TON of it due to the storms here in the Twin Cities.

Can you help me identify the this?



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seal the ends and its good for turning especially in short pieces. Many of nice turnings and other small projects cane from fire wood piles.:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The pic of the tree down is one that is still down and yet to be sawed into sections. So, how long of sections should I have them cut into?

Additionally, how long would they need to air dry after being cut into lumber before I could use them in woodworking projects?
 

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Ash is nice wood to work with, and it can be very attractive. It's also being threatened by the emerald ash borer, which means it could very well be tough to come by in another decade or two, which would make me all the more determined to get some lumber from it. 8' - 10' lengths 5/4" thick would do well, though shorter lengths would be fine too.
 

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If you have it milled by someone with a bandsaw (Woodmizer, etc.) leave the crotch attached to the log, at least an 8' log. Slab the log with the crotch laying flat and you will be amazed at the grain you will see. Gary
 

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Not much else to say except don't wait too long before you get it sawn up. Some wood like Ash and hickory are prone to getting powder post beetles real quick when left on the ground.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
HomeBody said:
If you have it milled by someone with a bandsaw (Woodmizer, etc.) leave the crotch attached to the log, at least an 8' log. Slab the log with the crotch laying flat and you will be amazed at the grain you will see. Gary
I wouldn't have any use for the slabs. But, would people buy them? (Might be a way to pay back my insurance deductible :) )

How thick should the section be cut?
 

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Because of the EAB, ash lumber is cheap and plentiful. Did I mention it was cheap?

You could saw that tree into lumber (I suggest 4/4 and 8/4 in 8'6" lengths) and keep it from going to waste although you could just about buy Ash lumber for the cost of the milling.

If you intend to have it sawn, do it ASAP. Unless one is wanting spalted lumber, there is no benefit to "seasoning" it in log form. It will rot before it dries enough to be usable.
 
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