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Just call me Andrew
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I'm building a frame (mahogany) and panel (QS White Oak) tack trunk. My original thought was to miter the corners, but I have decided against it. My current thoughts are to rabbet with a corner block. The 4 sides are complete, now I need to figure out how to assemble them.

Here is a link to a sketchup of my proposed design:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/m0yz8b17vpzyzrb/TackTrunk Round 2 Rabbeted.skp


Attached is an image of the corner for those without Sketchup.

Thanks.
 

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Good grief, I'd hope so. How much weight are you expecting to put in this and how do you propose to secure the corners? Glue, glue and screw, something else?
 

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IMHO the 45° corner block is unnecessary but you can add it if you like. If you glue and brad nail the lap joint it will be more than strong enuf for your purposes.
 

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Just call me Andrew
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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
The only reason I thought to add the corner blocks was because the rabbet piece is only 1/4". I plan to use only glue.

I'd love to not bother with corner blocks if they aren't necessary.

I expect pretty heavy use as this will be used routinely for horse tack storage.
 

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For a heavy use box that was not going to use any mechanical fasteners or dowels then I'd go ahead ad use the corners. Might I ask why no brad nails for the corners???:icon_confused:
 

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Old Methane Gas Cloud
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I built a couple of tack boxes from Baltic Birch. I used the same joint with TB-III and shot brads. The bottom was rabbeted with the bottom glued in place. The bottom had the rabbets. Everything was clamped and the opposing corners were held square with the Rockler plastic thingies.

I made feet from white oak. The feet were three pieces, two sides and a glue block. The grain ran horizontal. (I didn't want the grain to such up any moisture.) And don't tell anyone, pocket screw joints. :yes:
 

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And don't tell anyone, pocket screw joints. :yes:

LOL, BUSTED!!

Just kidding.
Seriously though, we need to remember the intended use of the item being built. If its fine furniture, go all out and use the all wood with glue method of joinery and assembly. But for a utilitarian piece, there is no shame in using modern technology, aka the screw :laughing:

The corner block with screws, even from the underside so they wont show is a good thing in my opinion. Another option is to use a lock rabbet, basically a long tongue and groove. The corner braces are a must as they prevent all that racking force from concentrating on the narrow joint. :thumbsup:
 

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Just call me Andrew
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
This is utilitarian, but it is also furniture. So i'd like to use as much classical joinery as possible. Here's a picture of one of the sides of the trunk, with one coat of finish:
 

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Old Methane Gas Cloud
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This is utilitarian, but it is also furniture. So i'd like to use as much classical joinery as possible. Here's a picture of one of the sides of the trunk, with one coat of finish:
LOL!

Calling my tack boxes utilitarian would be a HUGE compliment. :laughing:
 

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Just call me Andrew
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks, Frank. I am aware that the stub tenon isn't as strong as a full tenon. I will be putting in some hidden screws or dowels to strengthen those corners before assembling the sides to each other.

My questions was more in regards to the joint between the two panels (front and side).
 
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