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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,
I would like to start some power carving, mainly making deeper bowls and fat rounded table legs. I do not have a lathe nor the space for one. I see a lot of people using something like the Arbortech turbo plane with an angle grinder for this kind of job. The issue / question I have is that I REALLY do not like using an angle grinder to the point that I have bought two and given away both of them because I just don't feel comfortable with my hands so close to the moving parts and when the wheel catches on something and kicks, it really just does not feel good to me. I was wondering people's experiences with the turbo plane; mainly, does it feel like a low risk attachment? Maybe more applicable, what are some other more genteel tools to make these pieces? Rotary tools? Rotary bits you would use? Hand tools? Aggressive sanding discs? Thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have a King Arthurs Tools Guinevere and use it with Kodiak Cutting Tools carbide burr bits. You can remove quite a bit of material with the, but there are also more aggressive bits. As has everything else, these got a bit more pricey.
Thanks for the reply. It's just a biiiit too pricey for starting out and seeing how I like it. What about trying an aggressive shaping dish? It seems like it would remove material, but I wouldn't be so afraid that it would slice my face off??
 

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Thanks for the reply. It's just a biiiit too pricey for starting out and seeing how I like it. What about trying an aggressive shaping dish? It seems like it would remove material, but I wouldn't be so afraid that it would slice my face off??
I purchased the set a few years ago along with their wood shaping disks and some carbide bits and have used it sparingly. It was, from memory, about half or so of what they cost now. Yeah pricey as everything is up in costs. There are some less expensive alternative systems. Just search the net for a flex shaft sanding system.

There are lots of videos on YT for power carving. I'd check those and see what looks like you'll be comfortable with. Personally I'd first try an angle grinder with one of these and see how it goes. The videos will show you technique. You most keep the blade shroud in place and also the outboard handle, for control. Your other choice for shaping is without power tools, using spoke shaves, draw knives and adze, files and rasps and other hand tools.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I purchased the set a few years ago along with their wood shaping disks and some carbide bits and have used it sparingly. It was, from memory, about half or so of what they cost now. Yeah pricey as everything is up in costs. There are some less expensive alternative systems. Just search the net for a flex shaft sanding system.

There are lots of videos on YT for power carving. I'd check those and see what looks like you'll be comfortable with. Personally I'd first try an angle grinder with one of these and see how it goes. The videos will show you technique. You most keep the blade shroud in place and also the outboard handle, for control. Your other choice for shaping is without power tools, using spoke shaves, draw knives and adze, files and rasps and other hand tools.
Thank you so much - this is exactly what I needed. I think I could get away with the angle grinder + shaping disc combo to remove bulk material (and feel like that's safe enough) and then switch to a flex shaft system for more of the refining and not have it be $600+. Appreciate all of your suggestions!
 

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Not to push you toward something you're uncomfortable with but I just used an angle grinder for the first time recently and my experience was good.

I started with a 36 grit flap disc because I too was nervous about using an angle grinder. The 36 grit flap disc worked pretty well for removing a lot of material but I could tell it wouldn't last very long so I decided to try out the kutzall shaping dish (original - course). I spent less than an hour on my project with this dish using very gentle pressure because I was afraid of kickback and going too deep too fast. In that time, I never had anything that made me nervous but I did produce roughly 5 gallons of sawdust.

I'm thoroughly impressed with how effective the angle grinder is with a flap disc and kutzall dish. As far as how safe it is? I can't say for sure, something can always go wrong with any powertool but I think being gentle with the pressure on the angle grinder should be reasonably safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Not to push you toward something you're uncomfortable with but I just used an angle grinder for the first time recently and my experience was good.

I started with a 36 grit flap disc because I too was nervous about using an angle grinder. The 36 grit flap disc worked pretty well for removing a lot of material but I could tell it wouldn't last very long so I decided to try out the kutzall shaping dish (original - course). I spent less than an hour on my project with this dish using very gentle pressure because I was afraid of kickback and going too deep too fast. In that time, I never had anything that made me nervous but I did produce roughly 5 gallons of sawdust.

I'm thoroughly impressed with how effective the angle grinder is with a flap disc and kutzall dish. As far as how safe it is? I can't say for sure, something can always go wrong with any powertool but I think being gentle with the pressure on the angle grinder should be reasonably safe.
Thanks Josh! I was buoyed and convinced by the posts here about the shaping discs so went on Amazon to purchase a Kutzall-like dish and then saw reviews of people's trips to the ER and images of torn flesh from kickback and went back into scared mode again. I realize that every tool is only as safe as its operator so maybe these people had poor technique, but I also only use tools that have multiple safety mechanisms built into them. Maybe an anti-kickback angle grinder with the dish would provide me a bit more security. I appreciate what you say though about slow and steady with just gentle pressure, rather than trying to hog out a lot of wood at once. That sounds like a good approach to me. Thanks for your help, Josh.
 
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