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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am applying 1/4" maple veneer plywood to a 6 foot long hallway (all walls are now 1/2" plywood), floor to ceiling. With maple moldings in the corners and the joints to hide seams. What's the best application method. I was thinking a thin bead of PL construction adhesive every 12" and brad nail the joints and corners where the molding will hide the brad nails. Also I would pin nail every 16".
Thanks for the advice
 

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some depends on the chance that you may have to remove someday. but i would consider much like you, an adhesive and machanical fastener. I maybe would consider staples if you have a 1/4" crown stapler, they will hold the ply better than a brad.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Great Idea Thanks.
I am using 1 1/4" moldings for the seams and corners. So hopefully filling nail holes is very minimal.
On a side note:
I have to trim out an entrance way with maple that is 4 5/8" wide jamb and I need 2" trim to cover that to hide the irregular opening after I shim it plumb. Any thought on how to accomplish this without using solid maple at a cost I figure of $150.00 plus
 

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Great Idea Thanks.
I am using 1 1/4" moldings for the seams and corners. So hopefully filling nail holes is very minimal.
On a side note:
I have to trim out an entrance way with maple that is 4 5/8" wide jamb and I need 2" trim to cover that to hide the irregular opening after I shim it plumb. Any thought on how to accomplish this without using solid maple at a cost I figure of $150.00 plus
If this is the exterior of the entryway would the HO consider using a pvc trim? Not the cheapest either, but a good brick mold and a build up should hide at a reasonable cost. Kinda depends on the look you are trying to achieve. If it has to be stain grade consider poplar and work up a color using spray to control tone. If the opening is in stucco and you have a good hand for it, tack up some lathe with bead and finish closer to the opening and then use the smaller amount of maple to match.
 

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ihackwood said:
Stick the glue to the noard and pull the board away to let it breathe,

Make a couple of wedges to go from one wall to the next you won't use as many nails and will look better.
The only thing I would add to this is to use as many boards as necessary and use sizable blocks between the boards and the plywood to distribute pressure as evenly as possible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If this is the exterior of the entryway would the HO consider using a pvc trim? Not the cheapest either, but a good brick mold and a build up should hide at a reasonable cost. Kinda depends on the look you are trying to achieve. If it has to be stain grade consider poplar and work up a color using spray to control tone. If the opening is in stucco and you have a good hand for it, tack up some lathe with bead and finish closer to the opening and then use the smaller amount of maple to match.
Interior doorway turned into a entrance way between 2 rooms. Now has no door and customer wants a maple look to it.
 

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Interior doorway turned into a entrance way between 2 rooms. Now has no door and customer wants a maple look to it.
How about maple plywood with a small bead molding attached nearest the entryway and a larger bead molding attached toward the rear, that way you can create a large molding through a build up. Might be cheap especially if you have scrap maple ply.
 

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When I moved into my house (a 1927 Brick Craftsman), someone from the 1960s had *very* carefully cut, glued, and nailed dark plywood trim to the interior walls. It made the already small house feel like a cave. When I pulled the paneling off, it tore big chunks of plaster out of the walls due to heavy construction adhesive that was used. The pieces of original trim had been ripped off, or cut to accomodate this horror show.

Whatever the customer wants to do, try to be considerate towards someone who comes after that may disagree with the choice to panel the wall.

Were I in your position, I'd recommend a board-and-batten design, where thin strips of trim and nailed over the edge seams and on 16" centers to create a coffer-panel sort of design. 18ga staples should hold 1/4" on w/o trouble
 
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