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Carpenter & Joiner
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I have bought an apartment and I'm starting work on it in September. I'm going to completely refurbish it. It hasn't been properly worked on since the 1970's so it's a state. Everything is coming out, kitchen, bathrooms, second fix (trim carpentry) and even floorboards are being replaced. The heating system is a storage heater which is less than desirable so I'll be changing that too and all the electrics are being replaced.

The first thing I'm going to replace is the kitchen because more than anything else I like good food haha! I'm not going to buy a kitchen from some hardware store, I'm going to build my own. I know how I'm going to build it but what I'm not sure about is what materials to use... They all have pros and cons so I'm looking purely at how they're going to look!

I've seen some really nice 18mm 8x4 sheets of birch ply which would make good strong carcasses and I can't imagine there being much movement after I've fixed them. Or I could make the cabinets out of 18mm pine furniture board. I wish I could use hardwoods but in England hardwood is so expensive you can't even buy it in normal hardware stores, I have to buy mine online.

The problem with caracasses out of Ply is that I don't want the Ply's end to be on show, it reminds me of shuttering carpentry so I want to put some sort of 1/8 of an inch batton over it to cover it but then I'm thinking that might not look great once you open the door so I'm torn between Ply or Pine.

The doors are going to be pine for sure. and the worktop is going to be a nice slab of Oak.

What are you guys ideas and tips? I've been doing it for years now but if there's one thing I've learnt is that I can always learn some more! =]

Thanks guys!
 

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I did exactly the same thing 7 or 8 years ago. Ripped out everything and replaced. The only difference is that was a rental unit so I bought all cabinetry. The one thing that I learned is that the portable air compressor is your friend.

George
 

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bzguy
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Cut some of the same pine you use for doors at 18 mm X 18 mm.
Bevel edges of the pine at 3/32" or so with router, do the same with edges of birch panels.
This leaves a nice looking reveal and is a lot less work than trying to sand edge-banding perfectly flush to panels.
Attach flush to panels on flat bench with glue and brad-nailer, fill holes.
I finish my cabinet panel parts before assembly, this allows me to spray flat with no runs, much better results.
Assemble and and use full overlay euro hinges for doors, leaving 1/8th" clearance between doors.
Pine edge-banding disappears in the shadows and looks great with door open, basic euro style construction.
 

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Build your cabinet carcasses using the birch plywood and build face frames out of pine. As for the doors - depends on the style you are looking for. Whether they be inset or overlay and do you want flat panels or raised? Do consider panels for the doors because solid wood will move. All woods will move as the seasons change and the wood will move across the grain, not length wise. The ply has no movement and that's why it is so popular in cabinet builds.
 
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