Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,762 Posts
The parent company appears to market a really broad range of materials.
I noticed obsidian and flint knapper's tools!!!!!!
Suggests to me that they shopped around for tool lines of great merit.

Lee Valley is running the CZ Narex tools.

As a wood carver, I bought 1 pr of 1S/12 and bought a second pair 10(?) days later.
The steel is readily sharpened, and holds an edge for several hours.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
"The parent company appears to market a really broad range of materials.
I noticed obsidian and flint knapper's tools!!!!!!
Suggests to me that they shopped around for tool lines of great merit."

So that could be a good thing?...Or just irony? Sorry if I do not get it.

I am in europe, and due to import-taxes, it often gets very expensive, to buy things in the states.

I already hit the button on these ones, so fingers crossed, and hope for the best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,762 Posts
Sorry if my assessment seemed a little oblique. Given the variety of top quality goods, I would surmise that they have been quite careful to find top quality _everything_.

If you get a good result, I'd like to know that.
I'd see if I could buy an 18mm and turn it into a 1S/18 skew (20 degree bevel) for wood carving. I have 2 pairs of 1S/12 and a big Pfeil 1S/25. Something in the middle would be useful.
 

·
Wood Snob
Joined
·
5,963 Posts
mikmak said:
http://www.mehr-als-werkzeug.de/product/701387/DICK-Chisel-Long-Pattern-6-Piece-Set-in-a-Wood-Case.htm

Upgrading a little bit, and having my eyes set on these ones. They match my budget, but it is a bit of a jungle for a newbie, buying tools.
I can't say for sure and have never tried them but they look like they were fashioned by someone who knows what a chisel of this type should incorporate. Nice shaped handle, stout ferrule on the striking end not just decorative. The grind looks better than most in that price range. Best of luck and let us know.

I would also add. If an experienced woodworker can't and won't use a lesser quality tool. How on Gods green earth can a newbie. Don't call yourself that as if your not experienced enough for the top of the line tools. I understand the budget excuses but don't agree it should govern all our tool purchases. Set your goals on a higher level to eliminate the chances of missing them.

Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 

·
Master firewood maker
Joined
·
1,973 Posts
I will admit freely that I have always had cheap tools, and I am sure that has affected what little woodworking I have done so far. But that has also helped me to learn how to sharpen to the point where I believe my chisels and plane irons are as sharp as anyone else's, and there is no comparison between them and how sharp the chisels are straight off the shelf, The biggest difference now is that they simply don't hold their edge as long as the better chisels.

I that these come pretty dang sharp already, and that the backs are already flat.

I guess what I'm saying is that, obviously you will still need learn (or know) how to sharpen them just like any other chisel ... you may just not need to do it as often.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thank you all for your inputs.

I am sure these will be an upgrade, from what I am using now. Calling myself a newbie?...well since I have only worked with wood for a few months, it seemed like the right word. I am a student, which means I can not use a lot of money on tools. I have to be selective, and save up to get some quality tools, but also without waiting forever. Get the balance rigth sort of speak.

I had the company sharpen them before shipping. Ofcourse I will have to learn how to sharpen chisels, but at the moment I find myself spending more time sharpening, rather than using them. So much to learn.

I will let you know how I like them, when they arrive. Thanks once again.
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,017 Posts
I will admit freely that I have always had cheap tools, and I am sure that has affected what little woodworking I have done so far. But that has also helped me to learn how to sharpen to the point where I believe my chisels and plane irons are as sharp as anyone else's, and there is no comparison between them and how sharp the chisels are straight off the shelf, The biggest difference now is that they simply don't hold their edge as long as the better chisels.

I that these come pretty dang sharp already, and that the backs are already flat.

I guess what I'm saying is that, obviously you will still need learn (or know) how to sharpen them just like any other chisel ... you may just not need to do it as often.
+1. :yes: I agree, that learning how to sharpen makes life a lot easier. Tool cost may mean better steel. I try to use the proper tool for what I'm doing. If I'm carving, I use carving tools. That doesn't mean that I haven't used a bench chisel to do some paring.

It's much easier to keep an edge current, than wait until the tool drags, and cuts rough, and at that point having to establish an entirely new edge. You can feel the difference. So, if your budget only allows certain tool expense, make the most out of what you have.





.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,529 Posts
I would also add. If an experienced woodworker can't and won't use a lesser quality tool. How on Gods green earth can a newbie. Don't call yourself that as if your not experienced enough for the top of the line tools. I understand the budget excuses but don't agree it should govern all our tool purchases. Set your goals on a higher level to eliminate the chances of missing them.

Al

Nails only hold themselves.
I read that very differently; having been a newbie recently (it could be argued that I still am), I assumed he meant that it's very hard to figure out which tools are good, which tools are expensive, and where the two overlap.

There are expensive tools that are junk. There are expensive tools that are amazing. Having never used one before, how do I know which is which?

I do partly agree with you, though: Being a beginner doesn't mean you should buy low quality tools.
 

·
Wood Snob
Joined
·
5,963 Posts
amckenzie4 said:
I read that very differently; having been a newbie recently (it could be argued that I still am), I assumed he meant that it's very hard to figure out which tools are good, which tools are expensive, and where the two overlap.

There are expensive tools that are junk. There are expensive tools that are amazing. Having never used one before, how do I know which is which?

I do partly agree with you, though: Being a beginner doesn't mean you should buy low quality tools.
I can only think of a few tools with a high cost that are junk. Bridge City Tools comes to mind. I mean they are well made and refined. But some of them are worthless.

Oops. Don't want to hijack the thread.

Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I read that very differently; having been a newbie recently (it could be argued that I still am), I assumed he meant that it's very hard to figure out which tools are good, which tools are expensive, and where the two overlap.

There are expensive tools that are junk. There are expensive tools that are amazing. Having never used one before, how do I know which is which?

I do partly agree with you, though: Being a beginner doesn't mean you should buy low quality tools.
That was what I meant. English is not my first language, so maybe that confuses a bit.

I have just started my woodworking adventure, so please feel free to hijack. I need all the inputs available. Being a student I just try to find the best value for money ratio.

I have only a humid basement available, but a cup of something, and the smell of fresh tree, and some good music on the radio, makes me feel good.

You guys seems like I can learn something from, so thank you for helping a "newbie" :notworthy:.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,529 Posts
As a comment on the basement: be aware that high humidity will cause problems with your wood. If it's high enough, wood will mildew. If not, it may cause wood to warp (cup, bow, twist, whatever) when you bring it in, and possibly again when you bring it out. If the basement is especially humid, I'd recommend buying a dehumidifier. At least where I live they're not too expensive. If you can't, and the basement has any windows, buy a fan and run it (blowing out the window) whenever you can. It will help, some.

As to the rest: Where in Europe are you? There are some good manufacturers of hand tools over there, I'm sure. If you go into the User Control Panel ("User CP") and set your location, at least to what country you're in, we may be able to give better advice.

I suppose that I haven't actually bought any low-quality high-cost tools for woodworking yet, but I have for other things. I work in IT (computer support), and sometimes the most expensive option is also the lowest quality. And sometimes you can get something exceedingly close to the best quality for a lot less than the best brand costs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,529 Posts
I can only think of a few tools with a high cost that are junk. Bridge City Tools comes to mind. I mean they are well made and refined. But some of them are worthless.

Oops. Don't want to hijack the thread.

Al

Nails only hold themselves.

I just wanted to add one more comment; apparently Proformax tools are/were quite expensive and pretty bad.

I have one of the first Proformax drum sanders. Even have the veritable speed drive for it. It has been sitting dismantled in the corner for 19 years. I paid so much for it I was going to make it work if it killed me. What a wicked destructive hunk of junk that tool was.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
The chisels arrived, and they are indeed very nice. Thank you for your inputs.

Wonder what I will need next...Christmas is getting close.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,762 Posts
mikmak
Thanks for the good report.
What have you got/what are you using/what do you need for sharpening gear?
Santa might smile on you, yet!
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top