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I have a similar marking gauge with shaft and square guide. I'm curious what the curved guide is for. Can you post a pic of the other side? Mine was inherited, like Steve, I haven't used one since high school
 

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Egg Spurt
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A type of panel gauge, maybe?
Yup..tracing along areas too far away..The middle slide helps stabilize the path I believe..Don't quote me on this though..I have seen them used, but it's been awhile.
 
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I use cutting gauges a lot. I make them in different sizes and usually with the slide longer than the typical store-bought English marking gauge (more like the Japanese). I like slides that fit my hand better than the typical square-ish slide. Some are made purposely for incising round surfaces like table tops to prepare for banding. Where is this going? Oh, yeah, sometimes I will make several slides for one bar for different uses. Where do I store them? On the bar -- that keeps it all together. Not much diff between marking and cutting gauges; one has a pin, the other a blade.
 

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I thought it was a panel gauge too, but the proportions make it a marking gauge.

Cutting gauges are indispensable. I don’t see how anyone can build furniture without them. I have 6 or 7 WN T 8m sure that makes you happy. 😁
 

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My best guess is this gauge just has 2 different heads he used for different moods.

I only have 4 marking gauges, so I'm a little behind DR...I also use mine a bunch. Whenever i cut joinery, a marking gauge is usually involved. The only part of a mortise and tenon you actually see is the outside of the shoulder. This will scribe a nice line to help you cut a clean joint
 

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where's my table saw?
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My best guess is this gauge just has 2 different heads he used for different moods.

I only have 4 marking gauges, so I'm a little behind DR...I also use mine a bunch. Whenever i cut joinery, a marking gauge is usually involved. The only part of a mortise and tenon you actually see is the outside of the shoulder. This will scribe a nice line to help you cut a clean joint
That's what I think. It's definitely a shop made gauge, so he used the longer base slider for more accurate lines, maybe down the length of a board and the shorter guide with the brass wear plate for tenons. Try it out and see what type of scribe it makes. probably just a sharpened nail? You can make a new scribe without destroying it's value. I'd flatten out a 8 or 16 penny nail and file it to a sharp radius rather than a point. This will slice any fibers rather than tearing away at them. JMO.
 

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My guess is the original owner added the panel gage fence to his standard ga. It looks too short to be a true panel ga.
Here are some links for panel gages none seem to be that short or have a dual fence.
calabrese55




 

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where's my table saw?
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Great links posted above! Thanks. So what we have is a combination of marking gauge and a less than ideal panel gauge, exactly as I described it:

That's what I think. It's definitely a shop made gauge, so he used the longer base slider for more accurate lines, maybe down the length of a board and the shorter guide with the brass wear plate for tenons. Try it out and see what type of scribe it makes. probably just a sharpened nail? You can make a new scribe without destroying it's value. I'd flatten out a 8 or 16 penny nail and file it to a sharp radius rather than a point. This will slice any fibers rather than tearing away at them. JMO.
 
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