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Chester's Gorilla
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Hi everyone,

In the most recent Fine Woodworking, there's an article on the "L" fence for the table saw and its many uses, including rabbets, taper cuts, pattern cutting, etc. Pure genius!

Has anyone made one? I'm going to make one myself and want to know if there are any modifications or additions that people have put into the jig.

Thanks in advance, -SW
 

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I had toyed with making something like that a while ago (drawing below). For those who haven't seen it, the "L" comes from two lengths being attached at 90 degrees. One face is secured to the fence, the other face is positioned above the workpiece and acts as your new fence. Using a straight edge attached to the workpiece, you guide the workpiece through the cut with the straight-edge sliding along the L-fence.


The blade is set just above the top of the workpiece and will score the straight-edge. This allows for mitered cuts that will just fall away instead of getting pinched against the fence. Angled cuts are made by angling the workpiece to the straight-edge. The window is there to allow you to clear any pieces as they fall off the cut (didn't have that on my original design).
 

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i've been using something like that for 10 years for thin piece rips. it was included in all the older ridgid TS OMs.

http://www.ridgidparts.com/pdf/TS24121.pdf

check out pages 34 and 35 in the above OM. really quite handy.
Two different animals. The L-fence is attached to the TS fence. It doesn't move with the workpiece. It is set just above the workpiece and the workpiece slides under it. The straight-edge, that is attached to the top, is what rides on the L-fence.

Here's the FWW link. They explain it better: http://www.finewoodworking.com/workshop/article/the-incredible-l-fence.aspx
 

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where's my table saw?
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I have a Delta Unifence

It has 2 vertical positions, high and low. The low position is only 1/2" off the table and is great for material up to 3/4" thick. It provides enough clearance for your hand between the blade and fence to push thinner material through safely OR use a push stick/block. I love that fence. :yes:




For a Biesemeyer style fence which is just a flat sided rectangle with add on faces, there is a simple solution, an "L" shaped fence. The fence is attached or in my case clamped to the Biesemeyer and the low portion is spaced away similar to the Unifence. It's an easy fence addition to make for thinner material. You just need to make certain your bottom fence board is straight edged and parallel. The top board that get clamped, is not so critical.



Here's the thread: http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f7/whats-your-table-saw-fence-like-48149/
 

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I had some time to kill, so I modified the original sketch to better show the L-fence the OP was referring to. The bottom right in the sketch is a blow up at a different isometric view showing how the workpiece slides under the L-fence.

 

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Master firewood maker
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sorry ... i admit it ... sometimes i'm pretty dense ... is it just to make it easier to work with when ripping smaller and thinner pieces? or what am i missing?
 

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where's my table saw?
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that's why I like it

:yes:
 

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sorry ... i admit it ... sometimes i'm pretty dense ... is it just to make it easier to work with when ripping smaller and thinner pieces? or what am i missing?
I don't see this working with thin pieces because you have to attach a guide to it. If you use turner's tape, you may destroy the thin piece when separating it from the guide. You can't screw or nail the guide because the piece is too thin.

The idea is to create a new fence surface away from the TS fence and "float" the L-fence to a height just above the top of the piece you want to cut.

If you want to make a bevel cut, you take your workpiece, attach the guide piece to it and use the guide piece to glide along the outer edge of the L-fence. The cutoff would end up under the L-fence, where there is plenty of room for it to just fall away. This, rather then getting pinched between the blade and fence and shooting back at you.

If you want to make an angle cut (as I tried to show in the drawing above), you attach the guide piece to the workpiece at whatever angle you want to make the cut. This would replace a taper jig. The waste would again end up under the L-fence and just fall away between the blade and TS fence.

The FWW article does a much better job explaining it but you have to be a member to see it all. It has its drawbacks in that you have to attach a guide to the workpiece. So you either use turner's tape, screws somewhere they won't damage the workpiece, or maybe pin it in place.

This is an example of a bevel cut, before the cut (top) and after the cut (bottom):
 

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where's my table saw?
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you could...

make an "L" fence with a rabbet the height of your workpiece thickness + 1/32" to allow the work to easily slide under the fence.
This will act as a continuous length hold down, for thin workpieces which tend to fly .."up, up, and away", since the rear of the blade rotation is upward.

You would still have a parallel fence under/behind the rabbet to register your work piece on. The rabbet would be on a separate piece that can be easily unscrewed for changes in thickness. Not good for cutting anything other than parallel rips, however, no angles. :no:

I think it's a great idea for increased safety. I prefer to have the off fall on the left of the blade, bevel or no bevel. JMO
 

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Chester's Gorilla
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
sorry ... i admit it ... sometimes i'm pretty dense ... is it just to make it easier to work with when ripping smaller and thinner pieces? or what am i missing?
Julie did a fine job explaining it. For me, it seems like a great solution for taper cuts, patterns etc. that need a straight edge or specific angles that are either difficult or impossible with miter saws and sleds. Seems like a better solution than trying to cut a taper with the bandsaw and then losing material or sniping at the jointer (I only have a 4" jointer).

It would also be ideal for woodworkers who want to cut straight grain out of boards that are not straight grain. Just attach any other handy board to the top as a template.

Great discussion. Thanks, -SW
 
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