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Discussion Starter #1
So I was thinking about making a thickness sander (cause I don't have the money for a planer :/) and I was thinking about building stumpy nubs thickness sander but using a table saw to power it. I seen a plan on shop notes using a table saw to power it so you don't have to buy an electric motor.....GENIUS. ...If I can figure out how to make it work lol....so is this madness or genius??? Sometimes one leads to another. Any thoughts or nits of wisdom?
 

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I'm planning to eventually build a thickness sander. I wanted to be starting on it in the next month or two, now it looks like I'll be packing up and my family will be moving, so it'll be on hold for a while - probably at least 6 months or more.

I've looked at a lot of designs, including the one you mentioned that is powered by a table saw. I'm fortunate enough that my dad had a spare 1HP motor laying around that I was able to talk him out of. I now have it and it's waiting for whenever I build mine. The way that it is powered with the table saw is by putting a pulley on the arbor in place of the blade.

While powering it with the table saw certainly would save some money, it would also provide a lot of hassle, IMO. I'd hate to have to go back and forth with setting each up. I'd also hate to have to keep picking the sander up and moving it around every time I used it or needed to put it away. Buying a brand new motor can be a little spendy, but if you keep an eye on your local Craigslist page(s), you might catch a 3/4 HP or better motor showing up on it sometime for a good price. Or, when it gets warmer, check garage/rummage sales.

If you can't find a used, working motor for a good price, you could always build it to be used with the table saw if you are impatient, and then still keep an eye out for a good price on a motor and then fit that into the sander later on.
 

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where's my table saw?
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there are 2 types of drum sanders

The first type is like a thickness planer and squeezes the work between the drum, a feed roller and a moving belt. I have a 12" Grizzly and a 24" General. The wood does overheat, resin builds up on the paper and they generate a lot of dust, but you will get a constant thickness workpiece.

The second type is like a jointer. The drum is slightly below the flat table rather than above like the ones I mentioned. As the drum spins the hook and loop paper "balloons" off the drum slightly and contacts the bottom of the workpiece. The flat table will not allow you to control the depth of cut, it is fixed. I really like the concept:


If I were to build one or buy the commercial version shown above, I would come up with a feed system above the workpiece, although it's not a necessity. It will not give you a constant thickness workpiece however.

Pricing and other info:
http://www.woodline.com/p-2590-flatmaster-sander-accessories.aspx
 

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My unwillingness to throw down $600 on a planer has lead me to build a router sled. Pretty simple jig can flatten any width of stock. You just have to have a large flat work surface. Lots of plans and even a woodwhisperer video on it.
 

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I actually just watched the WW video yesterday, the one where he uses it for a workbench. ...that also seams like it would take forever! Is it a pretty speedy process and do you have to sand a lot after?
 

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How long it would take depends on the width of the bit you've used. Im still putting mine together and trying to decide with bit would work best. I'm considering something like this:

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2001869/3414/WoodRiver-14-Flute-Cutter-Router-Bit.aspx

but not sure if it is what I need. As far as sanding afterwards I would think it would only need some surface clean up... I had planned on doing it with a smoother plane.
 
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