Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
If you saw my intro you already know I have one of those orange toys. Just curious if I have any Wood-Mizer brethren in da house. :thumbsup:

A few tantalizing pics for ya.

Slicing up a large honey locust.'


A pretty clear and very dead cherry tree from my brother's yard.


Big ol' sycamore butt log. Due to the diameter it required notching for the blade guide a couple of times.



Poplar cuts like butta.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
I'm jealous, my cousin has one he's used for years that looks to be the same as yours. We used it to mill all the lumber for my patio cover project this summer. Only about 1k bf of red cedar but damn was it fun! And the look on peoples faces when they find out that not only did I build the patio cover but I milled the wood too is priceless. I get a whole lot more satisfaction out of building with lumber I milled myself. Drooling over that cherry btw.
 

·
Sawing against the Wind
Joined
·
2,383 Posts
Woodmizers???

You must've picked the wrong forum.......JUST KIDDING!!!!

First, WELCOME to WWT.....woodmizers....mmmmmmm....maybe a few thousand to one of me and the other brands!!!! LOL .....BUT your still welcome here....ONLY one priority....we LOVE pictures!!!

That's some nice looking lumber!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Oh, trust me, pictures are not an issue.

I do need to get it under roof though as I'm always thinking on rainy or snowy days how nice it would be to saw a few logs. I store it inside but it can't be used to saw where I store it. Mobile has some advantage as to being able to take the mill on the road for sawing but it's a real hassle for cutting at home. Hook it up, pull it out, level it up, etc . . . and then put it away again.
 

·
Sawing against the Wind
Joined
·
2,383 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
I've got a Woodmizer LT-30 manual saw. I see yours is the hydraulic model :thumbsup: and wondering if you've ever used a Woodmizer without hydraulics? The hydraulic log turner is a real labor saver not to mention your back too. It appears to be in good shape too. I visit a plant in Logansport, Ind. how far are you from there?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
HeyTheWoodsman, what model is that? Was the trailer setup an after purchase option? Thanks
That's an LT40 hydraulic. It included the trailer but you can buy them for stationary use as well. Basically the mill would be on legs which are bolted to concrete.

I've got a Woodmizer LT-30 manual saw. I see yours is the hydraulic model :thumbsup: and wondering if you've ever used a Woodmizer without hydraulics? The hydraulic log turner is a real labor saver not to mention your back too. It appears to be in good shape too. I visit a plant in Logansport, Ind. how far are you from there?
Yes, I thought about buying an LT15 but really needed the tax write off that year. Of course, in the subsequent bad economy years I could have really used the money. I'm 40 miles from the Ciincinnati beltway and 60 miles from the Indianapolis beltway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
You must've picked the wrong forum.......JUST KIDDING!!!!

First, WELCOME to WWT.....woodmizers....mmmmmmm....maybe a few thousand to one of me and the other brands!!!! LOL .....BUT your still welcome here....ONLY one priority....we LOVE pictures!!!

That's some nice looking lumber!!!
Before buying the Wood-Mizer, I met up with Tim Cook of Cook's Sawmills when he delivered a 36" mill in Springboro, OH and watched it run while he did the training. I also visited a Baker reference near Lawrenceburg, IN while he sawed a 36" butt dia red oak log. Dude was in over his head and really didn't know what he was doing. Both are great machines (and they were diesels) and I'd like to have either one but they were both more expensive and limited by the 36" dimension between the support posts. I visited a couple of Wood-Mizer open houses and finally pulled the trigger.

Here's a link to my shed http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f28/my-sawmill-shed-21454/ . I have a portable Hud-Son Farmboss and it can be moved BUT I like it sitting in one place because I have all my "other" equipment there to use!!!
Great looking shed. We'll see what I can come up with but I definitely plan to have a dust blower to pull away as much dust as possible. That 36" Farmboss looks great.

PS - I do have a few feet of wood stacked about . . . that is worthy of a separate thread. :yes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Ok, lets discuss your drying operation with pictures:thumbsup:. Air dry only or do you have a kiln? Living in Indiania my guess is you have several different species of trees to saw?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Ok, lets discuss your drying operation with pictures:thumbsup:. Air dry only or do you have a kiln? Living in Indiania my guess is you have several different species of trees to saw?
Currently I can only air dry lumber. However, I did just purchase the Nyle Dry Kiln which is sold through Wood-Mizer (can dry a few thousand feet at a time) and I also ordered the plans on here thinking maybe I'd set up one or two low cost small kilns for small batch stuff.

Common species here: poplar, red oak, white oak, sassafras, cherry, walnut, black locust, honey locust, soft maple, hard maple, hickory, beech, white ash, sycamore, red cedar

Oh, you wanted pics . . . are you really sure ? I'm not sure that you can handle more pics.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
We no longer farm so selling all the old farm equipment opened up some building space. I use an old shed with good ventilation for air-drying. When the lumber is pretty dry I can then open up the doors on both ends (especially on nice, dry fall days) to really get the ol' MC down.

I have made up glue lam frames for stacking and drying the lumber straight and true with stickers every 18-20" or so. These are leveled up and keep the lumber off of the ground. They also allow me to move an entire stack with the skid loader or forklift.
Looking west in the drying shed

Looking east in the drying shed. The sawmill has been moved into another building now and there are a couple more stacks drying in its place.


I also use the aisle of our old cattle barn to dry lumber. I set it up with 2x6 across the feed bunks to dry straight and true.
Looking south

Looking north


Just off the air dry stacks - need kiln soon !


Other air-dried lumber awaiting the kiln. This shows the ends of maybe a 1/5 of whats up there


Kiln dried stock. Both of my shops are heated and air conditioned so the humidity is controlled for dry storage. This isn't all of it. There are also some bundles of curly cherry and heart pine resawn from whiskey warehouse beams stashed in dry storage. I think my total is somewhere around 15K feet and I'm looking forward to starting to sell some once I get a kiln running and also plan to use it wherever possible in my own work. I have pulled some of the really well air dried stuff like in on occasion and let it acclimate in the shop for a month or so. Worked OK but much of my work must meet AWI standards and using anything but kiln dried is asking to get into a heap of trouble.




I"M SICK . . . but I recognize this and plan to deal with it. :lol:
 

·
Sawing against the Wind
Joined
·
2,383 Posts
QUOTE "Currently I can only air dry lumber. However, I did just purchase the Nyle Dry Kiln which is sold through Wood-Mizer (can dry a few thousand feet at a time) and I also ordered the plans on here thinking maybe I'd set up one or two low cost small kilns for small batch stuff."

Here...I wanted mine "Super-Sized"
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f26/super-kiln-gets-super-carriage-51228/
THANKS DAREN!!! It's loaded, dried down to 6% and ready for sterilizing!!!
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f26/loaded-kiln-again-57191/

Woodsman, I thought I was good at using up space for storage and drying....BUT you've got me beat.....As a history buff, could you post me a few of the barn framing and structure?? Looks like heavy post and beam or even better Timber-framing. Thanks ..I picked up a log a while back and the guy had a round/arch top. His grand father built around 1950.....had T&G loft floor and he roller skated in it as a kid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Here...I wanted mine "Super-Sized"
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f26/super-kiln-gets-super-carriage-51228/
THANKS DAREN!!! It's loaded, dried down to 6% and ready for sterilizing!!!
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f26/loaded-kiln-again-57191/

Woodsman, I thought I was good at using up space for storage and drying....BUT you've got me beat.....As a history buff, could you post me a few of the barn framing and structure?? Looks like heavy post and beam or even better Timber-framing. Thanks ..I picked up a log a while back and the guy had a round/arch top. His grand father built around 1950.....had T&G loft floor and he roller skated in it as a kid.
Thanks for the compliments. I may pick your brain at some point as I really need to make better use of my sawmill as another stream of income. Although my market is custom woodworking, I envision sawing, drying and stocking several common species of lumber such as poplar, red oak, cherry as well as some common plywoods. Between Indy and Cincy there really aren't any good places for people or contractors to pickup this stuff (and the big box stores gouge on lumber). I would also be interested in selling "interesting" cuts off of the mill like you do. Although it would be a little ways out, I am getting quotes on LucasMill and Peterson dedicated slabbers because so many of the really big logs go to waste.

As for the barn, yes, it is timber framed but admittedly not of the best workmanship. It is mostly sweet gum lumber with pine siding. We covered it with metal a couple of years ago to preserve it and make it more weather tight. The barn on my neighbor's farm has arched trusses. These are made in a jig and the barn floor using green lumber that is spiked together. The barn used to be in our family but the owners sort of qualify for some less than endearing terms so I probably won't be taking any pics of that one. A few decades back, another part of our original farmland (dating to 1839) had a 14 sided barn and a gambrel roofed barn with a 75 ft poplar ridge beam. The local school system was nice enough to bulldoze them both when they bought the land so they could make a foot ball field and weight room/locker rooms. Progress. :thumbdown:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Thanks again. What I need now is another 3,000 sf on the shop as I'd to get all of my woodworking under one roof and use the smaller 1,600 sf building as storage so I can sell lumber and plywood without everyone seeing what I am working on, who it is for and what tools I have.

I have a competitor in the area that stopped at another shop to get some material but the owner was in the house. When he noticed the guy's (the competitor) vehicle he went out to the shop and found him sitting at his desk looking at paperwork on his desk.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top