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where's my table saw?
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
The antique (circa 1936) bed rail project has led to more repairs/restorations,
The ball foot on the dresser was missing a considerable chuck off the back side, barely noticable until turned upside down. Other problems were loose joints just about everywhere, nails in the drawer glides that were loose and falling down, knots in rails that made them weak, a loose back, just nailed on. I think that if this truly was an antique, it would not have been made with such a shoddy construction. My guess is either someone made some temporarily permanent repairs or the factory that made the thing was run by rough carpenters, maybe pipefitters, rather than woodworkers. 馃槅
To replace the turned section of ball foot I had to turn a duplicate section...man I totally respect you woodturners....cut a section out to replace the missing one and epoxy it in. see photos.
 

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Nice job woodnthings. Furniture restoration is an art in itself and that job looks real professional. BTW, what's the wood?
 

Old Methane Gas Cloud
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Wow Bill, that's a good repair.

On the construction of the dresser...

Thinking of what my parents bought during the 1930's, I would say that the construction techniques that you found were fairly typical. It was the depression and people wouldn't spend money. People bought 99% based on price and 1% based upon function.

I know that the "Cheapest is best" mentality of my parents lasted all of their lives.

I think that the dresser was built that way because everything else was built way too.
 
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where's my table saw?
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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Antique dresser repair part 2

Further inspection of this dresser revealed the drawers were "junk"
and the internals needed to be gutted and replaced. Drawer slides were worn and broken, drawer bottoms were missing a dado across one of the front panels and warped, drawer separators were too thin and cracked, drawers tilted down too far when pulled even a little ways out....
So, after about a weeks work on and off it's all back together, better than new and the drawers slide great and don't tip.

Originally taken on as a "challenge" I really got into this project and restoring the dresser to "better than new condition structurally" The appearance is left untouched to maintain the antique look and possibly value if any. Restoration may become my new calling, but in this case there was no renumeration, just the challenge. No, on second thought I still enjoy designing and building my own projects, but this was actually fun! :yes: bill
 

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where's my table saw?
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Part 2 conitinued

More detail pictures and final result:
 

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where's my table saw?
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Lots of discussion on antique restoration and repairs

So, I thought this might be of interest with the threads on chairs and tables here. A friend brought me this back in 2009 and it was "near death" internally, with broken pieces, sagging supports, inoperative drawer glides and a chunk missing from the ball foot. I took it on as a challenge and it turn out to be a lot of fun. I don't know the date or the origin/maker, but the exterior was maintained completely original.
See photos above......
 

where's my table saw?
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Whoa .....

I just noticed the pocket holes and screws holding the top on:




That really makes me wonder the origin and age of this piece. The "owner" was upset that I had done so much "repair" work and that I had destroyed the value of the piece .... even though it probably would have destroyed itself if left unrepaired. What is it's value?
What someone would pay for it?
What some book says it's worth?
What some expert online says it's worth?
Who cares?
In the automotive world, an "antique or historical" vehicle is more than 20 years old in the eyes of the Secretary of State of Michigan.
Cars cost more than dressers when purchased new, with some possible exceptions. So, I don't really know about this piece, but at least the thing actually holds stuff and you can access it ....... and it looks nice also. :vs_cool:
 

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Nice dresser. The question comes to mind if this is really considered an antique based on the age. We see many pieces that are similar in antique shops but don't demand the prices of some antiques we have seen. My wife and I sold some antiques when we moved from Louisiana. Didn't have room on the rental truck. Regretted it ever since.
 

johnep
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My dad had a bureau which was his pride and joy. It gradually deteriorated and I finally chopped it for fire wood. I discovered that it had been made from margarine or fruit boxes and the nails etc just covered with veneer.
johnep
 

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I just noticed the pocket holes and screws holding the top on:




That really makes me wonder the origin and age of this piece. The "owner" was upset that I had done so much "repair" work and that I had destroyed the value of the piece .... even though it probably would have destroyed itself if left unrepaired. What is it's value?
What someone would pay for it?
What some book says it's worth?
What some expert online says it's worth?
Who cares?
In the automotive world, an "antique or historical" vehicle is more than 20 years old in the eyes of the Secretary of State of Michigan.
Cars cost more than dressers when purchased new, with some possible exceptions. So, I don't really know about this piece, but at least the thing actually holds stuff and you can access it ....... and it looks nice also. :vs_cool:

Have you been working on this thing for 10 years?


George
 

where's my table saw?
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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Why do you ask that?

The thread I linked to is 10 years old.... to the day!


Have you been working on this thing for 10 years?


George

I coulda grown the trees to make the lumber to make the dresser in 10 years. :surprise2:
 
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