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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey All,

New to this forum, but have done a decent amount of woodworking over the years. Mainly larger construction, but have done a few cool furniture projects.

I've recently got into building more furniture (tables, headboards, etc) and am in desperate need of my own table saw. I'm very tight for space, as my main outside shop/shed is tiny. I have a covered carport/tent that i use to do most of my planing/jointing/lumber "milling" and so the saw i choose needs to be fairly mobile.

I've done a TON of searching and comparison. I'm on a tight budget and want to stay under 600$ (sucks, i know, but that's all I can afford).

After a lot of thought, seems like the ridged might do the trick, but debating between the full stand-style and the version with the collapsible stand. THe stand is very appealing for the amount of moving I'll need to do with it, however, i don't want to sacrifice too much in performance as I'm planing on doing a fair amount of work with hardwoods. Given I'm looking at "cheaper" saws compared to the high end cabinet saws, whats the input between these 2, or another comparable model?

I know I need/want the ability to adjust the blade to the fence, and sturdy fence. From the reviews I've read, the ridged seems to do well in those areas, but I'm open to other options:

http://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-13-Amp-10-in-Professional-Table-Saw-R4512/202500206#.UXApfHeGmrM

http://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-1...e-Saw-with-Stand-R4510/100090444#.UXAt3neGmrM

thanks for the help!
 

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I recently bought the cman 21833, which is basically the same thing as the ridgid 4512. So far I am really happy with it. Mine stays put, but when putting it together I tested the mobility and it moves pretty well. It is fairly heavy so if you have to go over any stairs or big bumps I would go for the collapsible one.
 

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I have this one and really like it. I have limited space also and this folds up and sits against the wall pretty nicely. I like it so much I went and bought the stand they make for a miter saw. I come for more of a constructions type background though not woodworking per say I am just getting into that after my recent purchases.
 

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the 4512 is a better saw than the 4510. more mass, less vibration, greater rip capacity. it is not as mobile as the 4510. the 4512's caster set will not easily negotiate even 1/2" rise between two level surfaces, where the 4510 will. your decision needs to determine whether accuracy or mobility are the more important factors.
 

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I agree that the 4512 is a better saw for the kinds of woodworking you seem to be doing. Mobility is another issue.

Bill
 

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I just purchased a R4512 about a month ago and am very happy with it, though I don't need the mobility you seem to do. It's a heavy saw and moves around easily, but I'll second the comments that it's not likely to navigate changes in floor height very well. When assembling the saw in my basement workshop, I set it up where I wanted it because I knew that it wouldn't fare well trying to cross over the cracks in my basement floor.

Whatever saw you purchase, if you're purchasing from Home Depot, get yourself a Harbor Freight 20% off coupon and ask them to pricematch it. If they do, you'll save yourself some money that you can spend on some other things, like a good sawblade.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well I ended up finding a use TS2400 that I picked up. It was in almost perfect shape. Prolly paid a bit too much, but was still 200$ less than new.

I was really wanting the 4512, but after really looking a t my shop space, decided it wouldn't be a good idea right now since 95% of my work Will be In the outside carport and rolling that big to g over the patio and potentially gravel on a regular basis would be terrible.

Haven't used it yet, but plan on building a crosscut sled, jointer jig and a jointer plank box to use my planer for facing boards tonight/this weekend. So we shall see how it goes!

I need to pickup a dado set and then make a no-clearance insert for it still... So many things to build, so I can actually BUILD something:)
 

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I was really wanting the 4512, but after really looking a t my shop space, decided it wouldn't be a good idea right now since 95% of my work Will be In the outside carport and rolling that big to g over the patio and potentially gravel on a regular basis would be terrible.
I think that was a good call. My 21833 rolls good on smooth concrete, but I couldn't imagine trying to push it through gravel.
 

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Well I ended up finding a use TS2400 that I picked up. It was in almost perfect shape. Prolly paid a bit too much, but was still 200$ less than new.

I was really wanting the 4512, but after really looking a t my shop space, decided it wouldn't be a good idea right now since 95% of my work Will be In the outside carport and rolling that big to g over the patio and potentially gravel on a regular basis would be terrible.

Haven't used it yet, but plan on building a crosscut sled, jointer jig and a jointer plank box to use my planer for facing boards tonight/this weekend. So we shall see how it goes!

I need to pickup a dado set and then make a no-clearance insert for it still... So many things to build, so I can actually BUILD something:)
I think you got a good deal. I've got the 4510, basically an upgraded 2400, and it would be tough to beat for mobility.
Not sure if the 2400 is the same but the 4510 is a breeze to align as all the trunion and fence adjustment bolts are available topside. That feature sometimes bothers me because I wonder how well the adjustments hold but they seem to be holding fine.
Check the manual for the dado set, my 4510 will only take a 6" set and a 3/4" stack. Arbor length is frequently reduced on universal motor saws in the interests of longevity. The 4510 has toolless riving knife adjustment/replacement and the retaining hardware is in the way of a larger dado stack.
Good Luck:smile:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
upgraded fence?

Hey all,

So in the process of getting the new saw setup. Purchased a new blade (though still not super high end). I need to do some rips 33" wide which got me thinking about upgrading the rip fence so i have a wider capacity. the only one i found was the AC1036 Retro Fit Rip Fence, however, it seems to be discontinued just about everywhere i look.

Anyone have any suggestions?
http://www.ridgidparts.com/accessories/AC1036.phtml
 

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Hey all,

So in the process of getting the new saw setup. Purchased a new blade (though still not super high end). I need to do some rips 33" wide which got me thinking about upgrading the rip fence so i have a wider capacity. the only one i found was the AC1036 Retro Fit Rip Fence, however, it seems to be discontinued just about everywhere i look.

Anyone have any suggestions?
http://www.ridgidparts.com/accessories/AC1036.phtml
i have a 1036 on my TS2412 (gray model) ridgid TS. it provides for 36" of rip capacity and doesn't appear that it will work on a 2400 as the mounting mechanisms appear to be incompatible. the 2400 rail system shifts right and left for storage and increases and decreases in rip capacity. the 1036 may be mountable, but only in a fixed position, where the front rail would be too long for the unit to stand up in a folded position.

relatively limited rip capacity is one of the limitations of saws like the 2400.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
i have a 1036 on my TS2412 (gray model) ridgid TS. it provides for 36"
of rip capacity and doesn't appear that it will work on a 2400 as the mounting mechanisms appear to be incompatible. the 2400 rail system shifts right and left for storage and increases and decreases in rip capacity. the 1036 may be mountable, but only in a fixed position, where the front rail would be too long for the unit to stand up in a folded position.

relatively limited rip capacity is one of the limitations of saws like the 2400.
Yah, just called ridgid. No luck on the bigger fence. Didn't realize that, but i guess i'll just have to figure out a way to rip the dimension off the opposite side of the fence. we'll see...
 
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